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, 66 (11), 2900-2908

Identification and Quantification of Avenanthramides and Free and Bound Phenolic Acids in Eight Cultivars of Husked Oat ( Avena Sativa L) From Finland

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Identification and Quantification of Avenanthramides and Free and Bound Phenolic Acids in Eight Cultivars of Husked Oat ( Avena Sativa L) From Finland

Salvatore Multari et al. J Agric Food Chem.

Abstract

Finland is the second largest oat producer in Europe. Despite the existing knowledge of phenolics in oat, there is little information on the phenolic composition of oats from Finland. The aim of the study was to investigate the concentrations of free and bound phenolic acids, as well as avenanthramides in eight Finnish cultivars of husked oat ( Avena sativa L.). Seven phenolic acids and one phenolic aldehyde were identified, including, in decreasing order of abundance: p-coumaric, ferulic, cinnamic, syringic, vanillic, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic, and o-coumaric acids and syringaldehyde. Phenolic acids were mostly found as bound compounds. Significant varietal differences ( p < 0.05) were observed in the cumulative content of phenolic acids, with the lowest level found in cv. 'Viviana' (1202 ± 52.9 mg kg-1) and the highest in cv. 'Akseli' (1687 ± 80.2 mg kg-1). Avenanthramides (AVNs) 2a, 2p, and 2f were the most abundant. Total AVNs levels ranged from 26.7 ± 1.44 to 185 ± 12.5 mg kg-1 in cv. 'Avetron' and 'Viviana', respectively.

Keywords: Avena sativa L.; Finnish oats; avenanthramides; dietary fiber; phenolic compounds.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no competing financial interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Total phenolic acid content of the oat cultivars. Results are expressed as sum of the cumulative free and bound phenolic acids and represent mean of four independent measurements. Values with unlike letters (a-c) differ significantly (p < 0.05).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Phenolic acids in oat cultivars reported as individual percentages of the total phenolic acid content.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Total avenanthramides content of the oat cultivars. Results are expressed as mean of three independent measurements. Values with unlike letters (a-f) differ significantly (p < 0.05).

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