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Review
. 2018 Jan 2;2018:5083634.
doi: 10.1155/2018/5083634. eCollection 2018.

Comparison of the Effectiveness of Whole Body Vibration in Stroke Patients: A Meta-Analysis

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Free PMC article
Review

Comparison of the Effectiveness of Whole Body Vibration in Stroke Patients: A Meta-Analysis

Yoo Jung Park et al. Biomed Res Int. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Objectives: The goals of this study were to assess the effectiveness of WBV (whole body vibration) training through an analysis of effect sizes, identify advantages of WBV training, and suggest other effective treatment methods.

Methods: Four databases, namely, EMBASE, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science, were used to collect articles on vibration. Keywords such as "vibration" and "stroke" were used in the search for published articles. Consequently, eleven studies were selected in the second screening using meta-analyses.

Results: The total effect size of patients with dementia in the studies was 0.25, which was small. The effect size of spasticity was the greatest at 1.24 (high), followed by metabolism at 0.99 (high), balance, muscle strength, gait, and circulation in the decreasing order of effect size.

Conclusions: The effect sizes for muscle strength and balance and gait function, all of which play an important role in performance of daily activities, were small. In contrast, effect sizes for bone metabolism and spasticity were moderate. This suggests that WBV training may provide a safe, alternative treatment method for improving the symptoms of stroke in patients.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flow diagram of studies included.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Homogeneity test.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Effect size at different vibration frequencies.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Effect size according to the time lapse after the onset of stroke.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Effect size according to the treatment period.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Effect size according to the number of treatments per week.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Changes per published year.

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References

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