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Meta-Analysis
, 97 (3), e9693

Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Road Traffic Accident Survivors: A PRISMA-compliant Meta-Analysis

Affiliations
Meta-Analysis

Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Road Traffic Accident Survivors: A PRISMA-compliant Meta-Analysis

Wanli Lin et al. Medicine (Baltimore).

Abstract

Background: Involvement in road traffic accidents (RTAs) may put individuals at increased risk for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, among which posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) presents a public health issue. However, a great disparity was observed among studies exploring the prevalence of PTSD among RTA survivors. This meta-analysis aimed to explore the pooled prevalence of PTSD among RTA survivors.

Methods: Electronic databases of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched to identify relevant studies. Study selection and data extraction were conducted independently by 2 investigators, and a meta-analysis was performed to synthesize the data. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated using the Cochran Q test and quantified using the I statistic. Subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of the heterogeneity. The possibility of publication bias was assessed using Egger linear test.

Results: Fifteen eligible studies containing 6804 RTA survivors were identified in this meta-analysis, of which 1489 were identified with PTSD. The pooled prevalence of PTSD among RTA survivors was 22.25% (95% confidence interval: 16.71%-28.33%). A high degree of heterogeneity was observed across studies (I = 97.1%, P < .001), with reported PTSD prevalence ranging from 6.3% to 58.3%. Subgroup analyses found that the prevalence of PTSD among RTA survivors varied significantly across studies in relation to the instrument used to assess PTSD, country, race, gender, and education level (P < .05).

Conclusion: The high pooled prevalence of PTSD among RTA survivors found in this study significantly underscores the need for providing timely and effective intervention strategies for RTA survivors.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have no funding and conflicts of interest to disclose.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flow chart of study identification and selection.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Forest plot presenting the prevalence of PTSD among RTA survivors. PTSD = posttraumatic stress disorder, RTA = road traffic accident.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Funnel plot of the 15 studies included in this meta-analysis.

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