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, 103 (11), 1013-1019

Approaching Quality Improvement at Scale: A Learning Health System Approach in Kenya

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Approaching Quality Improvement at Scale: A Learning Health System Approach in Kenya

Grace Irimu et al. Arch Dis Child.

Abstract

No abstract available

Keywords: hospital care; low-income country; networks; quality.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Scatter plot showing each hospital’s performance in documentation (grey circular markers) based on the mean of all patient scores in each month from first month to the 34th month of joining the Clinical Information Network for each site. Each variable (fever, cough, difficulty breathing, diarrhoea, vomiting, convulsions, weight, oedema, stridor, respiratory rate, grunting, chest indrawing, acidotic breathing, wheeze, crackles, temperature gradient, pulse character, capillary refill time, skin pinch duration, sunken eyes, pallor, central cyanosis, disability scale (Alert, Voice, Pain, Unresponsive (AVPU)), ability to drink, stiff neck) is given a score of 1; each patient record is then given a score out of 25 and the mean score calculated for all patients in that month. The solid central trend line with black dots represents the median value of the 14 hospital-specific observations and the upper and lower grey trend lines represent the upper and lower IQRs of the 14 hospital-specific observations, respectively.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Scatter plots showing each hospital’s performance in documentation (grey circular markers) each month from March 2014 to November 2016 for a clear primary discharge diagnosis for ages 0–12 years (A) and HIV status for all admissions aged 0–12 years (B) both with target documentation rate at 80%. Panel (C) illustrates documentation of blood glucose test results for all patients aged 0–12 years with any danger sign with target of 60%. The solid central trend line with black dots represents the median value of the 14 hospital-specific observations and the upper and lower grey trend lines represent the upper and lower IQRs of the 14 hospital-specific observations, respectively.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Scatter plots showing each hospital’s performance in documentation (grey circular markers) each month from March 2014 to November 2016 for documentation of mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) for all admissions aged 6–59 months (A) and documentation of oxygen saturation of all admissions aged 1 month to 12 years (B). The solid central trend line with black dots represents the median value of the 14 hospital-specific observations and the upper and lower grey trend lines represent the upper and lower IQRs of the 14 hospital-specific observations, respectively.

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References

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