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Meta-Analysis
. 2018 Mar 28;13(3):e0194563.
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0194563. eCollection 2018.

Tooth Loss and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Dose-Response Meta Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

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Free PMC article
Meta-Analysis

Tooth Loss and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Dose-Response Meta Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

Fei Cheng et al. PLoS One. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Conflicting results identifying the association between tooth loss and cardiovascular disease and stroke have been reported. Therefore, a dose-response meta-analysis was performed to clarify and quantitatively assess the correlation between tooth loss and cardiovascular disease and stroke risk. Up to March 2017, seventeen cohort studies were included in current meta-analysis, involving a total of 879084 participants with 43750 incident cases. Our results showed statistically significant increment association between tooth loss and cardiovascular disease and stroke risk. Subgroups analysis indicated that tooth loss was associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in Asia and Caucasian. Furthermore, tooth loss was associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in fatal cases and nonfatal cases. Additionally, a significant dose-response relationship was observed between tooth loss and cardiovascular disease and stroke risk. Increasing per 2 of tooth loss was associated with a 3% increment of coronary heart disease risk; increasing per 2 of tooth loss was associated with a 3% increment of stroke risk. Subgroup meta-analyses in study design, study quality, number of participants and number of cases showed consistent findings. No publication bias was observed in this meta-analysis. Considering these promising results, tooth loss might provide harmful health benefits.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1. Flow diagram of the study selection process.
Fig 2
Fig 2. Forest plots for meta-analysis of tooth loss and risk of cardiovascular disease.
Fig 3
Fig 3. Dose-response relationship between tooth loss and risk of cardiovascular disease.
Fig 4
Fig 4. Forest plots for meta-analysis of tooth loss and risk of stroke.
Fig 5
Fig 5. Dose-response relationship between tooth loss and risk of stroke.

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The authors received no specific funding for this work.
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