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Randomized Controlled Trial
, 97 (13), e0253

Mapping the Human Brain During a Specific Vojta's Tactile Input: The Ipsilateral Putamen's Role

Affiliations
Randomized Controlled Trial

Mapping the Human Brain During a Specific Vojta's Tactile Input: The Ipsilateral Putamen's Role

Ismael Sanz-Esteban et al. Medicine (Baltimore).

Abstract

A century of research in human brain parcellation has demonstrated that different brain areas are associated with functional tasks. New neuroscientist perspectives to achieve the parcellation of the human brain have been developed to know the brain areas activation and its relationship with different stimuli. This descriptive study aimed to compare brain regions activation by specific tactile input (STI) stimuli according to the Vojta protocol (STI-group) to a non-STI stimulation (non-STI-group). An exploratory functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was performed. The 2 groups of participants were passively stimulated by an expert physical therapist using the same paradigm structure, although differing in the place of stimulation. The stimulation was presented to participants using a block design in all cases. A sample of 16 healthy participants, 5 men and 11 women, with mean age 31.31 ± 8.13 years was recruited. Indeed, 12 participants were allocated in the STI-group and 4 participants in the non-STI-group. fMRI was used to map the human brain in vivo while these tactile stimuli were being applied. Data were analyzed using a general linear model in SPM12 implemented in MATLAB. Differences between groups showed a greater activation in the right cortical areas (temporal and frontal lobes), subcortical regions (thalamus, brainstem, and basal nuclei), and in the cerebellum (anterior lobe). STI-group had specific difference brain activation areas, such as the ipsilateral putamen. Future studies should study clinical implications in neurorehabilitation patients.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have no funding and conflicts of interest to disclose.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Group activation map showing the main effect of group. Images thresholded at P < .001. Neurological convention is followed (left side of the brain is shown on the left side of the figure). Results are visualized using xjView toolbox (http://www.alivelearn.net/xjview).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Map showing the differences between the specific tactile input (STI)-group > non-STI-group stimulation in the left side of the body. Images thresholded at P < .001. Neurological convention is followed (left side of the brain is shown on the left side of the figure). Results are visualized using xjView toolbox (http://www.alivelearn.net/xjview).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Map showing the differences between the specific tactile input (STI)-group > non-STI-group stimulation in the right side of the body. Images thresholded at P < .001. Neurological convention is followed (left side of the brain is shown on the left side of the figure). Results are visualized using xjView toolbox (http://www.alivelearn.net/xjview).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Map showing the differences between the specific tactile input (STI)-group > non-STI-group stimulation. Images thresholded at P < .001. Neurological convention is followed (left side of the brain is shown on the left side of the figure). Results are visualized using xjView toolbox (http://www.alivelearn.net/xjview).
Figure 5
Figure 5
The image shows the activation of the thalamus area during the activation of the specific tactile input (STI)-group > non-STI-group. Images thresholded at P < .001. Neurological convention is followed (left side of the brain is shown on the left side of the figure). Results are visualized using xjView toolbox (http://www.alivelearn.net/xjview).
Figure 6
Figure 6
The image shows the activation of the putamen area during the activation of the specific tactile input (STI)-group > non-STI-group. Images thresholded at P < .001. Neurological convention is followed (left side of the brain is shown on the left side of the figure). Results are visualized using xjView toolbox (http://www.alivelearn.net/xjview).
Figure 7
Figure 7
The image shows the activation of the anterior part of the cerebellum during the activation of the specific tactile input (STI)-group > non-STI-group. Images thresholded at P < .001. Neurological convention is followed (left side of the brain is shown on the left side of the figure). Results are visualized using xjView toolbox (http://www.alivelearn.net/xjview).

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