Dietary intake in the early years and its relationship to BMI in a bi-ethnic group: the Born in Bradford 1000 study

Public Health Nutr. 2018 Aug;21(12):2242-2254. doi: 10.1017/S1368980018000654. Epub 2018 Apr 2.

Abstract

Objective: To assess relationships between dietary intake at age 12, 18 and 36 months and BMI Z-scores at age 36 months in a bi-ethnic group.

Design: A prospective cohort study comparing cross-sectional and longitudinal data. Exposures included dietary intake at 12, 18 and 36 months (FFQ) with an outcome of BMI Z-score at age 36 months.

Setting: Born in Bradford 1000 study, Bradford, UK.

Subjects: Infants at age 12 months (n 722; 44 % White British, 56 % Pakistani), 18 months (n 779; 44 % White British, 56 % Pakistani) and 36 months (n 845; 45 % White British, 55 % Pakistani).

Results: Diet at age 12 months was not associated with BMI Z-score at age 36 months. Higher consumption of vegetables at 18 and 36 months was associated with a lower BMI Z-score at 36 months (model coefficient (95 % CI): -0·20 (-0·36, -0·03) and -0·16 (-0·31, -0·02), respectively). Higher consumption of high-fat chips at age 36 months was associated with a lower BMI Z-score at age 36 months (-0·16 (-0·32, 0·00)). Overall, White British children had higher 36-month BMI Z-scores than Pakistani children (adjusted mean difference (95 % CI): 0·21 (0·02, 0·41)).

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that dietary intake at 18 and 36 months was somewhat related to BMI Z-score at age 36 months and suggest the importance of early interventions aimed at establishing healthy eating behaviours.

Keywords: BMI; Diet; Ethnicity; Infant; Obesity.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Asian Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data*
  • Body Mass Index*
  • Child, Preschool
  • Diet / statistics & numerical data*
  • Eating / physiology
  • Ethnic Groups / statistics & numerical data
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Obesity
  • Prospective Studies
  • United Kingdom / epidemiology
  • Vegetables