Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2018 Apr 3;19(4):1064.
doi: 10.3390/ijms19041064.

In Vitro Influence of Extracts From Snail Helix Aspersa Müller on the Colon Cancer Cell Line Caco-2

Affiliations
Free PMC article

In Vitro Influence of Extracts From Snail Helix Aspersa Müller on the Colon Cancer Cell Line Caco-2

Magdalena Matusiewicz et al. Int J Mol Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is the third most widely diagnosed cancer. Extracts from snails may modulate growth and development of colorectal cancer cells. The objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition of tissues derived from Helix aspersa Müller and red-ox properties of tissue extracts. Then, the influence of extracts and their fractions of different molecular weights on viability of Caco-2 cells was examined. Tissue lyophilisates contained antioxidants that could be important in the prevention of colorectal cancer. Moreover, we confirmed the presence of a wide array of compounds that might be used in treatment of this disease. The decrease of cell viability after the application of extracts from lyophilized mucus and foot tissues was affirmed. The effect of extract from mucus could be related to the content of some proteins and peptides, proper essential amino acids (EAA)/non-essential amino acids (NEAA) ratio, Met restriction and the presence of Cu, Ca, Zn, Se. The influence of the extract from foot tissues could be assigned additionally to the presence of eicosapentaenoic, α-linolenic, linoleic and γ-linolenic acids. The opposite effect was demonstrated by extract from lyophilized shells which increased cell viability. Further studies are needed to know whether dietary supplying of H. aspersa Müller tissues can be used as an approach in colorectal cancer management.

Keywords: Caco-2; Helix aspersa Müller; chemical composition; colon cancer; tissue extracts.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Red-ox state indicators: (a) ferric-reducing antioxidant power; (b) ABTS·+ (2.2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation) scavenging activity; (c) DPPH· (2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical) scavenging activity; (d) TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) of extracts from mucus, foot tissues and shells of Helix aspersa Müller. Error bars indicate standard error of the mean (SEM). Statistically significant effect: values of one marker without common superscript (A,B) are statistically significantly different (p < 0.01). n = 6.
Figure 2
Figure 2
SDS-PAGE analysis of proteins isolated from Helix aspersa Müller body parts. Panel (a)—molecular weights of standard proteins furnished by Sigma-Aldrich, Inc.; panel (b)—mucus extract; panel (c)—foot tissues extract and panel (d)—shell extract.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Viability of Caco-2 cell line after (a) 24 h and (b) 72 h of treatment with extracts from mucus (M), foot tissues (F) and shells (S) of Helix aspersa Müller, at the concentrations of 2500, 250, 25, 2.5 µg/mL (2500, 250, 25, 2.5, respectively). C—control cells. Error bars indicate standard error of the mean (SEM). Statistically significant effect: * represents values that differ from control at p <0.05, ** represents values that differ from control at p <0.01. n = 6.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Viability of Caco-2 cell line after treatment with fractions >50 kDa (50K), 10–50 kDa (10K), 3–10 kDa (3K), <50 kDa (50F), <10 kDa (10F) and <3 kDa (3F) of extracts from different body parts of Helix aspersa Müller, at the concentrations of 25 and 2.5 µg/mL (25 and 2.5, respectively). (a,b)—cell viability after treatment for 24 h with fractions of extracts from foot tissues and shells, respectively; (c) cell viability after treatment for 72 h with fractions of extract from mucus. C—control cells (treated with deionized water). Error bars indicate standard error of the mean (SEM). Statistically significant effect: * represents values that differ from control at p < 0.05, ** represents values that differ from control at p < 0.01. n = 6.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 2 articles

References

    1. Arnold M., Sierra M.S., Laversanne M., Soerjomataram I., Jemal A., Bray F. Global patterns and trends in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Gut. 2017;66:683–691. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310912. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Bathen T.F., Holmgren K., Lundemo A.G., Hjelstuen M.H., Krokan H.E., Gribbestad I.S., Schønberg S.A. Omega-3 fatty acids suppress growth of SW620 human colon cancer xenografts in nude mice. Anticancer Res. 2008;28:3717–3723. - PubMed
    1. Cai F., Sorg O., Granci V., Lecumberri E., Miralbell R., Dupertuis Y.M., Pichard C. Interaction of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with radiation therapy in two different colorectal cancer cell lines. Clin. Nutr. 2015;33:164–170. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.04.005. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Luo F., Xing R., Wang X., Peng Q., Li P. Proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid profiles of marine snail Rapana venosa meat, visceral mass and operculum. J. Sci. Food Agric. 2017;97:5361–5368. doi: 10.1002/jsfa.8425. - DOI - PubMed
    1. El Ouar I., Braicu C., Naimi D., Irimie A., Berindan-Neagoe I. Effect of Helix aspersa extract on TNFα, NF-κB and some tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer cell line Hs578T. Pharmacogn. Mag. 2017;13:281–285. doi: 10.4103/0973-1296.204618. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
Feedback