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. 2018 Aug;266:323-327.
doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.03.031. Epub 2018 Mar 17.

Psychiatrists' and Dentists' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Adverse Drug Reactions of Psychotropic Drugs

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Psychiatrists' and Dentists' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Adverse Drug Reactions of Psychotropic Drugs

Maximilian Gahr et al. Psychiatry Res. .

Abstract

Psychotropic drugs may induce impairments in the mouth, jaw and face area. Currently, appropriate pharmacoepidemiologic data are missing. Therefore, a questionnaire-based telephone survey of two non-representative samples of psychiatrists and dentists was conducted. Most of the psychiatrists (79.7%) and dentists (76.5%) indicated that psychotropic drugs may induce dental adverse drug reactions (ADR); in both samples there was an approximately equally sized, relevant proportion of participants who did not believe in the risk of dental ADR of psychotropic drugs (psychiatrists 20.3%; dentists 23.5%). About one third of the participants of both samples (psychiatrists 34.9%; dentists 35.9%) felt that dental ADRs of psychotropic drugs are a serious health problem. The majority of both groups (psychiatrists 97.8%; dentists 97.0%) had never reported a dental ADR. Most psychiatrists and dentists appeared to be aware of the risk of dental ADRs by psychotropic drugs. A relevant proportion of participants of both groups considered psychotropic drugs to be irrelevant regarding dental ADRs; therefore, there may be information needs in both groups. The willingness to report dental ADRs of psychotropic drugs was low in both groups; the evaluation of the actual relevance of this drug-related risk is impeded by the absence of reports of suspected ADRs.

Keywords: Antidepressants; Antipsychotics; Bruxism; Caries; Depression, Dental health; Pharmacovigilance; Psychopharmacotherapy; Schizophrenia; Xerostomia.

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