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Review
, 4 (4), CD001841

First-line Drugs for Hypertension

Affiliations
Review

First-line Drugs for Hypertension

James M Wright et al. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.

Abstract

Background: This is the first update of a review published in 2009. Sustained moderate to severe elevations in resting blood pressure leads to a critically important clinical question: What class of drug to use first-line? This review attempted to answer that question.

Objectives: To quantify the mortality and morbidity effects from different first-line antihypertensive drug classes: thiazides (low-dose and high-dose), beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB), and alpha-blockers, compared to placebo or no treatment.Secondary objectives: when different antihypertensive drug classes are used as the first-line drug, to quantify the blood pressure lowering effect and the rate of withdrawal due to adverse drug effects, compared to placebo or no treatment.

Search methods: The Cochrane Hypertension Information Specialist searched the following databases for randomized controlled trials up to November 2017: the Cochrane Hypertension Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We contacted authors of relevant papers regarding further published and unpublished work.

Selection criteria: Randomized trials (RCT) of at least one year duration, comparing one of six major drug classes with a placebo or no treatment, in adult patients with blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg at baseline. The majority (over 70%) of the patients in the treatment group were taking the drug class of interest after one year. We included trials with both hypertensive and normotensive patients in this review if the majority (over 70%) of patients had elevated blood pressure, or the trial separately reported outcome data on patients with elevated blood pressure.

Data collection and analysis: The outcomes assessed were mortality, stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), total cardiovascular events (CVS), decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and withdrawals due to adverse drug effects. We used a fixed-effect model to to combine dichotomous outcomes across trials and calculate risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). We presented blood pressure data as mean difference (MD) with 99% CI.

Main results: The 2017 updated search failed to identify any new trials. The original review identified 24 trials with 28 active treatment arms, including 58,040 patients. We found no RCTs for ARBs or alpha-blockers. These results are mostly applicable to adult patients with moderate to severe primary hypertension. The mean age of participants was 56 years, and mean duration of follow-up was three to five years.High-quality evidence showed that first-line low-dose thiazides reduced mortality (11.0% with control versus 9.8% with treatment; RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.97); total CVS (12.9% with control versus 9.0% with treatment; RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.76), stroke (6.2% with control versus 4.2% with treatment; RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.77), and coronary heart disease (3.9% with control versus 2.8% with treatment; RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.84).Low- to moderate-quality evidence showed that first-line high-dose thiazides reduced stroke (1.9% with control versus 0.9% with treatment; RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.61) and total CVS (5.1% with control versus 3.7% with treatment; RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.82), but did not reduce mortality (3.1% with control versus 2.8% with treatment; RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.05), or coronary heart disease (2.7% with control versus 2.7% with treatment; RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.20).Low- to moderate-quality evidence showed that first-line beta-blockers did not reduce mortality (6.2% with control versus 6.0% with treatment; RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.07) or coronary heart disease (4.4% with control versus 3.9% with treatment; RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.03), but reduced stroke (3.4% with control versus 2.8% with treatment; RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.97) and total CVS (7.6% with control versus 6.8% with treatment; RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.98).Low- to moderate-quality evidence showed that first-line ACE inhibitors reduced mortality (13.6% with control versus 11.3% with treatment; RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.95), stroke (6.0% with control versus 3.9% with treatment; RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.82), coronary heart disease (13.5% with control versus 11.0% with treatment; RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.94), and total CVS (20.1% with control versus 15.3% with treatment; RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.85).Low-quality evidence showed that first-line calcium channel blockers reduced stroke (3.4% with control versus 1.9% with treatment; RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.84) and total CVS (8.0% with control versus 5.7% with treatment; RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.87), but not coronary heart disease (3.1% with control versus 2.4% with treatment; RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.09), or mortality (6.0% with control versus 5.1% with treatment; RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.09).There was low-quality evidence that withdrawals due to adverse effects were increased with first-line low-dose thiazides (5.0% with control versus 11.3% with treatment; RR 2.38, 95% CI 2.06 to 2.75), high-dose thiazides (2.2% with control versus 9.8% with treatment; RR 4.48, 95% CI 3.83 to 5.24), and beta-blockers (3.1% with control versus 14.4% with treatment; RR 4.59, 95% CI 4.11 to 5.13). No data for these outcomes were available for first-line ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers. The blood pressure data were not used to assess the effect of the different classes of drugs as the data were heterogeneous, and the number of drugs used in the trials differed.

Authors' conclusions: First-line low-dose thiazides reduced all morbidity and mortality outcomes in adult patients with moderate to severe primary hypertension. First-line ACE inhibitors and calcium channel blockers may be similarly effective, but the evidence was of lower quality. First-line high-dose thiazides and first-line beta-blockers were inferior to first-line low-dose thiazides.

Conflict of interest statement

JMW: none.

VM: none.

RG: none.

Figures

1
1
Study flow diagram
2
2
Risk of bias graph: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item presented as percentages across all included studies.
3
3
Risk of bias summary: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item for each included study.
1.1
1.1. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 1 Total mortality.
1.2
1.2. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 2 Total stroke.
1.3
1.3. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 3 Total coronary heart disease.
1.4
1.4. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 4 Total cardiovascular events.
1.5
1.5. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 5 Total hospitalizations.
1.6
1.6. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 6 Withdrawal due to adverse effects.
1.7
1.7. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 7 Systolic blood pressure.
1.8
1.8. Analysis
Comparison 1 First‐line thiazide vs placebo, Outcome 8 Diastolic blood pressure.
2.1
2.1. Analysis
Comparison 2 First‐line beta‐blocker vs placebo, Outcome 1 Total mortality.
2.2
2.2. Analysis
Comparison 2 First‐line beta‐blocker vs placebo, Outcome 2 Total stroke.
2.3
2.3. Analysis
Comparison 2 First‐line beta‐blocker vs placebo, Outcome 3 Total coronary heart disease.
2.4
2.4. Analysis
Comparison 2 First‐line beta‐blocker vs placebo, Outcome 4 Total cardiovascular events.
2.5
2.5. Analysis
Comparison 2 First‐line beta‐blocker vs placebo, Outcome 5 Withdrawal due to adverse effects.
2.6
2.6. Analysis
Comparison 2 First‐line beta‐blocker vs placebo, Outcome 6 Systolic blood pressure.
2.7
2.7. Analysis
Comparison 2 First‐line beta‐blocker vs placebo, Outcome 7 Diastolic blood pressure.
3.1
3.1. Analysis
Comparison 3 First‐line ACE inhibitor vs Placebo, Outcome 1 Total mortality.
3.2
3.2. Analysis
Comparison 3 First‐line ACE inhibitor vs Placebo, Outcome 2 Total stroke.
3.3
3.3. Analysis
Comparison 3 First‐line ACE inhibitor vs Placebo, Outcome 3 Total coronary heart disease.
3.4
3.4. Analysis
Comparison 3 First‐line ACE inhibitor vs Placebo, Outcome 4 Total cardiovascular events.
3.5
3.5. Analysis
Comparison 3 First‐line ACE inhibitor vs Placebo, Outcome 5 Systolic blood pressure.
3.6
3.6. Analysis
Comparison 3 First‐line ACE inhibitor vs Placebo, Outcome 6 Diastolic blood pressure.
4.1
4.1. Analysis
Comparison 4 First‐line calcium channel blocker vs Placebo, Outcome 1 Total mortality.
4.2
4.2. Analysis
Comparison 4 First‐line calcium channel blocker vs Placebo, Outcome 2 Total stroke.
4.3
4.3. Analysis
Comparison 4 First‐line calcium channel blocker vs Placebo, Outcome 3 Total coronary heart disease.
4.4
4.4. Analysis
Comparison 4 First‐line calcium channel blocker vs Placebo, Outcome 4 Total cardiovascular event.
4.5
4.5. Analysis
Comparison 4 First‐line calcium channel blocker vs Placebo, Outcome 5 Heart Failure.
4.6
4.6. Analysis
Comparison 4 First‐line calcium channel blocker vs Placebo, Outcome 6 Systolic blood pressure.
4.7
4.7. Analysis
Comparison 4 First‐line calcium channel blocker vs Placebo, Outcome 7 Diastolic blood pressure.

Update of

  • First-line drugs for hypertension.
    Wright JM, Musini VM. Wright JM, et al. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009 Jul 8;(3):CD001841. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD001841.pub2. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009. PMID: 19588327 Updated. Review.

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