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Review
. 2018 Jun;89(6):835-842.
doi: 10.1111/asj.13017. Epub 2018 Apr 26.

New Lactic Acid Bacteria for Skin Health via Oral Intake of Heat-Killed or Live Cells

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Free PMC article
Review

New Lactic Acid Bacteria for Skin Health via Oral Intake of Heat-Killed or Live Cells

Hiromi Kimoto-Nira. Anim Sci J. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria play an essential role in the food industry in the manufacture of many fermented products (cheese, yogurt, fermented vegetables, etc.). Application of these organisms is now being extended to the area of health improvement, as their probiotic activities become known. Probiotics are defined as viable microorganisms that exert a beneficial effect on the health of the host when they are ingested in sufficient quantity. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria isolated from the human intestine are the most common probiotics used for human consumption. The development of new probiotics with new beneficial effects is eagerly awaited in the food industry. This review introduces Lactococcus, which are one of the genera of lactic acid bacteria and are mainly isolated from dairy products and fermented vegetables, as new probiotics, focusing especially on Lactococcus lactis H61, which improves skin status in Japanese women with oral intake of heat-killed or live cells. The deduced mechanisms associated with the beneficial effects of strain H61 are also discussed.

Keywords: Lactococcus; probiotics; skin health.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Skin hydration of the inner forearm of women in three age categories (30s, 40s, and 50s–60s) who received H61 cells or did not (placebo). A.U., arbitrary units. *< .05 versus Week 0
Figure 2
Figure 2
Sebum content in cheeks of women administered H61‐fermented milk or conventional yogurt for 4 weeks. *< .05

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