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, 30 (4), 486-489

The Effect of Short-Term Upper Thoracic Self-Mobilization Using a Kaltenborn Wedge on Pain and Cervical Dysfunction in Patients With Neck Pain

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The Effect of Short-Term Upper Thoracic Self-Mobilization Using a Kaltenborn Wedge on Pain and Cervical Dysfunction in Patients With Neck Pain

Hyung-Taek Oh et al. J Phys Ther Sci.

Abstract

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of short-term self-joint mobilization of the upper spine using a Kaltenborn wedge on the pain and cervical dysfunction of patients with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven patients with neck pain were divided into two groups; the self-mobilization group (SMG, n=13) and the self-stretching group (SSG, n=14). The SMG performed upper thoracic self-mobilization and the SSG performed self-stretching exercises as a short-term intervention for a week. To assess the degree of neck pain, the visual analog scale (VAS) was utilized, and to measure the joint range of motion at the flexion-extension, it was compared and analyzed by using the goniometer. [Results] Both SMG and SSG show a significant decrease in the visual analog scale and a significant increase in joint range of motion within the group. In the comparison of groups, there was no significant difference, but it indicated effects on improving the range of motion of extension in SMG. [Conclusion] Self-mobilization of the upper spine, using a Kaltenborn wedge, was useful in alleviating pain in and dysfunction of the cervical spine, and in particular, in improving cervical spine extension in this study.

Keywords: Kaltenborn wedge; Neck pain; Self mobilization.

Figures

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.
Kaltenborn wedge.

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