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. 2018 May 11;11(5):776.
doi: 10.3390/ma11050776.

Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Polyamide 6/Polystyrene Blends Prepared by Diffusion and Subsequent Polymerization of Styrene in Polyamide 6 Pellets

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Free PMC article

Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Polyamide 6/Polystyrene Blends Prepared by Diffusion and Subsequent Polymerization of Styrene in Polyamide 6 Pellets

Yin-Le Tan et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Polyamide 6 (PA6)/polystyrene (PS) blend pellets were prepared by diffusion and subsequent polymerization of styrene in commercial PA6 pellets and processed into cuboid-shaped bars by injection molding. The average PS particle size in the bars was 240 nm, slightly higher than that in the blend pellets (120 nm), showing that only limited coalescence occurs during injection molding. The mechanical properties of PA6/PS bars were investigated by tensile, flexural, and notched impact tests. A 41% increase in notched impact strength was found without decreasing the modulus, tensile, and flexural strengths and elongation to break, when compared with those of neat PA6 bars. These good mechanical properties were attributed to the small PS particle sizes, and the good interfacial adhesion between PS particles and the PA6 matrix resulted from the occurrence of PS grafting onto PA6 during the preparation of the blend pellets and injection molding. The water sorption and water-induced dimensional changes in PA6/PS bars were significantly less than those of neat PA6 bars because of the presence of the hydrophobic PS phase. This work reveals that the PA6/PS quasi-nanoblend pellets are useful stock for plastic production.

Keywords: injection molding; mechanical properties; nylon 6; polymer blends; polystyrene.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Micro-FTIR profiles of polyamide 6/polystyrene (PA6/PS): (a) pellet along the diameter direction and (b) bar along the width direction (distance 0 is the center of the pellet or bar and A1/A3 is the ratio of the peak areas of the absorptions at 758 cm−1 and 1122 cm−1, representing PS/PA6 at the measured position).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images of (a,b) a cross section of the PA6/PS blend pellet after etching with 15% aqueous trichloroacetic acid and (c,d) the cryofractured surface of the PA6/PS bar at two different magnifications.
Figure 3
Figure 3
DSC first heating curves of PA6 and PA6/PS pellets and bars at a heating rate of 10 °C/min.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Dimensional changes of PA6 and PA6/PS bars after storage in 70% RH for 5 days.
Figure 5
Figure 5
(a) Typical stress–strain curves of PA6 and PA6/PS bars in both dry and wet states and (b) FESEM micrograph of the necked part of PA6/PS wet bars after the tensile test, showing unstretched PS particles.

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