Association of pentraxin and high-sensitive C-reactive protein as inflammatory biomarkers in patients with chronic periodontitis and peripheral arterial disease

J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2018 Mar-Apr;22(2):112-115. doi: 10.4103/jisp.jisp_290_17.

Abstract

Context: Inflammation is a common feature of both peripheral artery disease (PAD) and periodontal disease.

Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between PAD and periodontal disease by examining the levels of inflammatory cytokines, pentraxin-3 (PTX-3), and high-sensitive C-reactive protein from serum.

Materials and methods: A total of 50 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients were divided into two groups: those with PAD (test group) and those with the non-PAD group (control group) based on ankle-brachial index values. Periodontal examinations and biochemical analysis for PTX-3 and high-sensitive C-reactive protein were performed to compare the two groups.

Statistical analysis used: All the obtained data were sent for statistical analyses using SPSS version 18.

Results: In the clinical parameters, there is statistically significant difference present between plaque index, clinical attachment loss, and periodontal inflammatory surface area with higher mean values in patients with PAD having periodontitis. There is statistical significant (P < 0.01) difference in all biochemical parameters (P < 0.05) considered in the study between PAD patients and non-PAD patients with higher mean values of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and PTX-3.

Conclusion: PTX-3 and acute-phase cytokine such as hs-CRP can be regarded as one of the best indicators to show the association between the PAD and periodontitis followed by hs-CRP, TC, very LDL (VLDL), and LDL. However, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a poor indicator for its association with chronic periodontitis and PAD.

Keywords: Biomarker; C-reactive protein; chronic periodontitis; pentraxin-3; peripheral artery disease.