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Case Reports
. 2019 Dec;35(12):1343-1354.
doi: 10.1080/09593985.2018.1478919. Epub 2018 May 25.

Outcomes Following a Locomotor Training Protocol on Balance, Gait, Exercise Capacity, and Community Integration in an Individual With a Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

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Case Reports

Outcomes Following a Locomotor Training Protocol on Balance, Gait, Exercise Capacity, and Community Integration in an Individual With a Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

Gabriele Moriello et al. Physiother Theory Pract. .

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The NeuroRecovery Network (NRN) established a locomotor training protocol that has shown promising results for individuals with spinal cord injury, yet research to date has not determined its feasibility in those with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this case report was to determine the feasibility of implementing the NRN protocol in an individual with a TBI. Case Description: The participant was a 38-year-old male, 21 years post-TBI. Twenty-four sessions of the therapy portion of the NRN protocol were provided. Outcome measures included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), spatial temporal parameters of gait, 6-Minute Walk Test and Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ). Outcomes: His BBS score improved from 37/56 to 43/56. Left step length improved; although gait speed, cadence, stride length and right step length did not. Observable changes were noted in quality of gait. Six-Minute Walk Distance increased by 47.2 m while CIQ score changes did not exceed the minimal detectable change (MDC) value. Discussion: Use of the NRN protocol may be feasible in individuals with TBI, though 24 sessions may not have been enough to achieve the full potential benefit of this intervention in an individual with a chronic TBI.

Keywords: Body weight support; Locomotor training; NeuroRecovery Network; traumatic brain injury.

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