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. 1985 Mar 18;36(11):1069-74.
doi: 10.1016/0024-3205(85)90492-8.

Restraint Stress Enhances Morphine-Induced Analgesia in the Rat Without Changing Apparent Affinity of Receptor

Restraint Stress Enhances Morphine-Induced Analgesia in the Rat Without Changing Apparent Affinity of Receptor

B D Appelbaum et al. Life Sci. .

Abstract

Antagonism of morphine analgesia (tail-flick assay) by naloxone was assessed quantitatively by in vivo "apparent" pA2 determination in unstressed rats and in rats subjected to restraint stress. Restrained rats had a higher baseline tail-flick latency than did unstressed (unrestrained) animals, and were more sensitive to the analgesic effect of morphine, as reflected in lower morphine ED50s. There was no significant difference between apparent pA2 values of unstressed and restrained rats using pA2 regression line analysis. This suggests that while stress enhances the analgesic effect of morphine, it does not appreciably alter opiate receptor affinity for naloxone under the conditions of this study.

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