Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
, 6 (2)

Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in Pediatric Populations

Affiliations
Review

Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in Pediatric Populations

Drew R Neavin et al. Diseases.

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a severe illness that afflicts about 16.6% of people over their lifetime. MDD is highly correlated with suicidality, and often first presents in adolescence. Unfortunately, many pediatric patients suffering from MDD go undiagnosed, and current evidence-based treatment options in the U.S. are limited to psychotherapy and two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Molecular mechanisms have been shown to play a role in MDD pathogenesis, progression, and response to medication, yet few studies have explored the role of these pathways in pediatric MDD. In this review, we outline the gravity and importance of MDD in pediatric patients, some challenges in diagnosis and treatment, current treatments available for pediatric patients, and research to investigate differences between pediatric and adult MDD. We hope that this review will provide an outline of the current understanding and treatment of MDD in pediatric patients, and provide thoughtful insights for future work that could advance our understanding of MDD in pediatric populations, and also identify new therapeutic strategies.

Keywords: major depressive disorder; pediatrics; treatment.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 1 article

References

    1. World Health Organization, Depression. [(accessed on 29 April 2018)]; Available online: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs369/en/
    1. Williams J.M., Barnhofer T., Crane C., Duggan D.S., Shah D., Brennan K., Krusche A., Crane R., Eames C., Jones M., et al. Pre-adult onset and patterns of suicidality in patients with a history of recurrent depression. J. Affect. Disord. 2012;138:173–179. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2011.12.011. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Zisook S., Lesser I., Stewart J.W., Wisniewski S.R., Balasubramani G.K., Fava M., Gilmer W.S., Dresselhaus T.R., Thase M.E., Nierenberg A.A., et al. Effect of age at onset on the course of major depressive disorder. Am. J. Psychiatry. 2007;164:1539–1546. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2007.06101757. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Kessler R.C., Berglund P., Demler O., Jin R., Merikangas K.R., Walters E.E. Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry. 2005;62:593–602. doi: 10.1001/archpsyc.62.6.593. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Costello E.J., Mustillo S., Erkanli A., Keeler G., Angold A. Prevalence and development of psychiatric disorders in childhood and adolescence. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry. 2003;60:837–844. doi: 10.1001/archpsyc.60.8.837. - DOI - PubMed
Feedback