Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Editorial
, 42 (4), 199-202

Towards a Greater Understanding of the Ductus Arteriosus

Affiliations
Editorial

Towards a Greater Understanding of the Ductus Arteriosus

Jeff Reese. Semin Perinatol.

Figures

Fig. 1 –
Fig. 1 –
Galen’s circulatory paradigm and early illustrations of the DA. (A) Galen’s scheme described transmission of blood across inter-ventricular pores to spread vital spirit in the body. (Adapted with permission from Dr. Barbara J. Becker, UC Irvine, and the Wellcome Collection (licensed under Creative Commons 4.0, CC BY).) (B) Hieronymus Fabricius of Aquapendente’s drawing shows the DA (“E”) as a prominent extension of the main pulmonary artery (“F”), similar in caliber to the ascending aorta (“D”), which was described as “the offshoot of the great artery to the artery-like vein, … a wide vessel in the fetus but becomes cord-like after birth.” (De formato fetu, 1600 AD). (Adapted with permission from Refs.,) (C) Johan van Horne’s addendum to illustrations in Leonardo Bottalo’s Opera Omnia (1660 AD) depicted the DA (canalis a pulmonali arteria tendens in aortam) in an unusual orientation. (Adapted with permission from Ref).
Fig. 2 –
Fig. 2 –
Assessment of DA closure. (A) Before sonography, DA closure rates were determined by the degree of ductus patency found at autopsy. (Adapted with permission from Refs.,) (B) Although patient populations have evolved over the past century, spontaneous closure rates recorded by postmortem examinations in 1918 (Adapted with permission from Refs.,) show a similar trend to current studies demonstrating successful DA closure in preterm infants as late as 18–24 months of age.,

Similar articles

See all similar articles

MeSH terms

Feedback