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, 19, 370-392
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Incidence of Cassava Mosaic Disease and Associated Whitefly Vectors in South West and North Central Nigeria: Data Exploration

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Incidence of Cassava Mosaic Disease and Associated Whitefly Vectors in South West and North Central Nigeria: Data Exploration

Angela O Eni et al. Data Brief.

Abstract

Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is one of the most economically important viral diseases of cassava, an important staple food for over 800 million people in the tropics. Although several Cassava mosaic virus species associated with CMD have been isolated and characterized over the years, several new super virulent strains of these viruses have evolved due to genetic recombination between diverse species. In this data article, field survey data collected from 184 cassava farms in 12 South Western and North Central States of Nigeria in 2015 are presented and extensively explored. In each State, one cassava farm was randomly selected as the first farm and subsequent farms were selected at 10 km intervals, except in locations were cassava farms are sporadically located. In each selected farm, 30 cassava plants were sampled along two diagonals and all selected plant was scored for the presence or absence of CMD symptoms. Cassava mosaic disease incidence and associated whitefly vectors in South West and North Central Nigeria are explored using relevant descriptive statistics, box plots, bar charts, line graphs, and pie charts. In addition, correlation analysis, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and multiple comparison post-hoc tests are performed to understand the relationship between the numbers of whiteflies counted, uninfected farms, infected farms, and the mean of symptom severity in and across the States under investigation. The data exploration provided in this data article is considered adequate for objective assessment of the incidence and symptom severity of cassava mosaic disease and associated whitefly vectors in farmers' fields in these parts of Nigeria where cassava is heavily cultivated.

Keywords: Cassava mosaic disease; Cassava mosaic virus; Whitefly vector; Zero hunger.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Distribution of 184 cassava farms surveyed in 12 South Western and North Central States of Nigeria in 2015.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Percentage contribution of each states to the 184 cassava farms covered in this study.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 30 cassava farms in Benue State.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 11 cassava farms in Ekiti State.
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Bar chart showing information the abundance about whiteflies 16 on cassava farms in Kogi State.
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Bar chart showing information the abundance about whiteflies on 12 cassava farms in Kwara State.
Fig. 7
Fig. 7
Bar chart showing information the abundance about whiteflies on cassava farms in 3 Lagos State.
Fig. 8
Fig. 8
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 10 cassava farms in Nassarawa State.
Fig. 9
Fig. 9
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 13 cassava farms in Niger State.
Fig. 10
Fig. 10
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 28 cassava farms in Ogun State.
Fig. 11
Fig. 11
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 15 cassava farms in Ondo State.
Fig. 12
Fig. 12
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 12 cassava farms in Osun State.
Fig. 13
Fig. 13
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 24 cassava farms in Oyo State.
Fig. 14
Fig. 14
Bar chart showing information about the abundance whiteflies on 9 cassava farms in Plateau State.
Fig. 15
Fig. 15
Boxplot representation of no. of whiteflies counted in 184 cassava farms across the 12 Nigerian States.
Fig. 16
Fig. 16
Boxplot representation of no. of uninfected cassava plants in 184 cassava farms sampled across 12 Nigerian States.
Fig. 17
Fig. 17
Boxplot representation of no. of infected cassava plants in 184 cassava farms sampled across 12 Nigerian States.
Fig. 18
Fig. 18
Boxplot representation of mean of Cassava mosaic virus symptom severity across 12 Nigerian States.
Fig. 19
Fig. 19
Multiple comparison post-hoc for mean whiteflies counted in 184 farms in 12 Nigerian States.
Fig. 20
Fig. 20
Multiple comparison post-hoc for mean uninfected cassava plants in 184 farms in 12 Nigerian States.
Fig. 21
Fig. 21
Multiple comparison post-hoc for mean infected cassava plants in 184 farms in 12 Nigerian States.
Fig. 22
Fig. 22
Multiple comparison post-hoc for mean of Cassava mosaic disease symptom severity.

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