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Balance and Lower Limb Muscle Activation Between In-Line and Traditional Lunge Exercises

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Balance and Lower Limb Muscle Activation Between In-Line and Traditional Lunge Exercises

Paulo H Marchetti et al. J Hum Kinet.

Abstract

In-line and traditional lunge exercises present differences in technique as lower limb positioning (anterioposterior), and medio-lateral (ML) balance may differentially affect primary and stabilizer muscles. The purposes of this study were to examine ML balance and muscle activation in anterior and posterior leg positions between in-line and traditional lunge exercises. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men (25 ± 5 years) performed 2 different lunge exercises (in-line and traditional) at their 10 repetition maximum in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography measured muscle activation of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, and gluteus medius. ML balance was measured with a Wii Fit Balance Board. The vastus lateralis activity was not significantly different between exercises or leg positions. The biceps femoris activity was not significantly different between exercises, however, it was significantly greater in the anterior compared to the posterior position for the in-line (p = 0.003), and traditional lunge (p < 0.001). The gluteus maximus activity was not significantly different between exercises, however, it was significantly greater in the anterior compared to posterior position for the in-line (p < 0.001) and traditional lunge (p < 0.001). ML balance was significantly greater in the in-line exercise in the anterior limb (p = 0.001). Thus, both in-line and traditional lunge exercises presented similar overall levels of muscle activation, yet the anterior limb generated the highest biceps femoral and gluteus maximus muscle activation when compared to the posterior limb. The in-line lunge presents greater ML balance when compared to the traditional lunge exercise.

Keywords: electromyography; performance; strength.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Feet width: (a) Traditional, and (b) In-line.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Mean and standard deviation of IEMG from (a) Vastus Lateralis, (b) Bíceps Femoris, (c) Gluteus Maximus, and (d) Gluteus Medius, between lunge exercises and lower limb positions. *Significantly different between conditions, p < 0.05.

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