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Case Reports
, 4 (2), 136-139
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Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Popliteal Artery With Spontaneous Regression

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Case Reports

Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Popliteal Artery With Spontaneous Regression

Masatoshi Jibiki et al. J Vasc Surg Cases Innov Tech.

Abstract

Cystic adventitial disease (CAD) of the popliteal artery with spontaneous regression is rare. We describe a 44-year-old man with rapid onset of severe intermittent claudication who is currently undergoing conservative follow-up. CAD was diagnosed, and resection of the lesion with autologous vein replacement was scheduled. However, the claudication suddenly improved at 5 weeks after onset. Computed tomography and ultrasound revealed that the cystic lesion in the adventitia had nearly disappeared. This case report describes the imaging findings and the possibility of conservative treatment. CAD can occur in the popliteal artery and is usually treated surgically. However, reports of spontaneous regression are rare. We report our experience with a case of CAD that eventually spontaneously regressed.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1
Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) on the initial visit revealed a so-called hourglass appearance, which is a typical finding of cystic adventitial disease (CAD).
Fig 2
Fig 2
Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) on the initial visit (1A-1C). CT revealed a cystic lesion in the right popliteal arterial wall occupying the intravascular lumen as well as multilocular cysts between the popliteal artery and femur. Seven weeks later, contrast-enhanced CT was performed again, revealing that cystic adventitial disease (CAD) of the popliteal artery had nearly disappeared. Although ring-thickened adventitia was observed, the popliteal artery was not stenotic and now showed cystic compression. Furthermore, the multilocular cysts between the popliteal artery and femur had become less prominent (2A-2C). Follow-up CT 10 months later showed that CAD had drastically diminished, and the multilocular cysts were also less prominent (3A-3C).

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