Chloroquine

Review
In: Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed®) [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; 2006.
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Excerpt

Very small amounts of chloroquine are excreted in breast milk; when given once weekly, the amount of drug is not sufficient to harm the infant nor is the quantity sufficient to protect the child from malaria. United Kingdom malaria treatment guidelines recommend that weekly chloroquine 500 mg be given until breastfeeding is completed and primaquine can be given.[1] Breastfeeding infants should receive the recommended dosages of chloroquine for malaria prophylaxis.[2] In HIV-infected women, elevated viral HIV loads in milk were decreased after treatment with chloroquine to a greater extent than other women who were treated with the combination of sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine.[3] Because no information is available on the daily use of chloroquine during breastfeeding, hydroxychloroquine or another agent may be preferred in this situation, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant.

Publication types

  • Review