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Review
. 2018 Oct 19;430(21):3997-4012.
doi: 10.1016/j.jmb.2018.07.009. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

Perspectives on Structural Molecular Biology Visualization: From Past to Present

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Free PMC article
Review

Perspectives on Structural Molecular Biology Visualization: From Past to Present

Arthur J Olson. J Mol Biol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Visualization has been a key technology in the progress of structural molecular biology for as long as the field has existed. This perspective describes the nature of the visualization process in structural studies, how it has evolved over the years, and its relationship to the changes in technology that have supported and driven it. It focuses on how technical advances have changed the way we look at and interact with molecular structure, and how structural biology has fostered and challenged that technology.

Keywords: molecular graphics; molecular modeling; structural molecular biology; visualization.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Balsa wood model of hemoglobin from Perutz Lab. ca.1960.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Stacked electron density (left) and brass Kendrew protein model (right) in Richards Box. ca. 1975
Figure 3.
Figure 3.
Screenshot of Bilder ca. 1977
Figure 4
Figure 4
Dot Molecular Surface with protein backbone trace ca. 1983
Figure 5.
Figure 5.
Image from AED 512 raster graphics display of protein-protein interaction between trypsin and trypsin inhibitor, ca. 1984
Figure 6.
Figure 6.
Frame from Omnimax animation of trip down DNA major groove, for Disney’s EPCOT Center, 1983
Figure 7.
Figure 7.
Frame from Maya Animation on clathrin mediated endocytosis. Image courtesy of Janet Iwasa, U. Utah, structural data from Thomas Kirchausen, Harvard Med.
Figure 8.
Figure 8.
Comparison of shaded image (Left) and shaded image with SSAO (Right) of GroEL-ES chaperonin complex. Image from PMV.
Figure 9.
Figure 9.
Interactive NGL ribbon image of HIV-1 capsid core particle.
Figure 10.
Figure 10.
CellPACK model of a complete mycoplasma cell interactively visualized in CellVIEW. Two clipping cubes reveal the interior (left) and the DNA alone (right)
Figure 11.
Figure 11.
CellPAINTing of HIV entry into a T-Cell
Figure 12.
Figure 12.
3D printed model of influenza virus.
Figure 13.
Figure 13.
Mesoscale blood plasma model, that was imported into VR in the CAVE in 1998.
Figure 14.
Figure 14.
Virtual Reality implementation of CellPAINT 3D. Video screen shows part of immersive HMD display.
Figure 15.
Figure 15.
Augmented reality display of 3D printed flexible polypeptide folding model. Tracking marker is seen near the top. Computer augmented amino acids can be manipulated and distances between them measured.

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