Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2018 Jul 14;7(7):112.
doi: 10.3390/foods7070112.

Peanut Consumption in Malawi: An Opportunity for Innovation

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Peanut Consumption in Malawi: An Opportunity for Innovation

Aggrey P Gama et al. Foods. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Peanuts are a valuable source of nutrients, but peanut consumption patterns, consumption frequencies, and the factors influencing peanut consumption in Malawi are not known. This study surveyed consumers to fill this knowledge gap and to assess Malawian consumers' readiness to try new food products. Out of the 489 respondents surveyed, all but three consumed peanuts (in any form). The majority (70.4%) consumed peanuts at least three times in a week. Chi-square test showed that demographic and socioeconomic variables had significant effects (p < 0.05) on peanut product preferences, the frequency of peanut consumption, and readiness to try new foods. For instance, women mostly preferred peanut flour compared to men, and peanut butter was the most preferred form for younger consumers. Logistic regression analysis showed that consumers with high school education or below were 2.35 times more likely to eat peanuts more often than consumers with post high school education. Among the participants that were ready to try new foods (54%), men and those with post high school education were 1.90 and 2.74 times more likely to try new foods than their respective counterparts. In general, the diversity of peanut products on the Malawian market is limited, and socioeconomic restrictions override consumer preferences. Therefore, future peanut-based food products innovations should explore ways to overcome such restrictions.

Keywords: Malawian consumer; consumer behavior; logistic models; peanut; peanut consumption.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Peanut products and their respective consumption and preference frequencies. Unlike for preference, the sum of consumption frequencies is more than 100% because multiple responses were allowed. Values followed by common letters (a, b, or c) indicate no significant difference (p > 0.05).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Peanut consumption rate related to consumer preference for the various peanut products. Frequency is the proportion of respondents categorized based on their most preferred peanut products.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Reasons behind consumer preferences for the various peanut products. Frequency is the proportion of respondents who gave a reason, categorized based on their most preferred peanut products.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Compelling reasons for ignoring fear for new foods as indicated by the neophobic consumers (n = 225).

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 3 articles

References

    1. Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Regional Overview of Food Insecurity in Africa. [(accessed on 1 June 2018)];2015 Available online: http://www.fao.org/3/a-i4635e.pdf.
    1. Malawi Government (MG) Malawi Growth and Development Strategy-III. [(accessed on 1 June 2018)];2017 Available online: https://cepa.rmportal.net/Library/government-publications/the-malawi-growth-and-development-strategy-mgds-iii.
    1. Ronzio R.A. The Encyclopedia of Nutrition and Good Health. 2nd ed. Infobase; New York, NY, USA: 2003.
    1. Awad A.B., Chan K.C., Downie A.C., Fink C.S. Peanuts as a source of β-sitosterol, a sterol with anticancer properties. Nutr. Cancer. 2000;36:238–241. doi: 10.1207/S15327914NC3602_14. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Sanders T.H., McMichael R.W., Hendrix K.W. Occurrence of resveratrol in edible peanuts. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2000;48:1243–1246. doi: 10.1021/jf990737b. - DOI - PubMed
Feedback