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. 2018 Jul 25;11(8):1288.
doi: 10.3390/ma11081288.

Fabrication of Crack-Free Nickel-Based Superalloy Considered Non-Weldable During Laser Powder Bed Fusion

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Free PMC article

Fabrication of Crack-Free Nickel-Based Superalloy Considered Non-Weldable During Laser Powder Bed Fusion

Oscar Sanchez-Mata et al. Materials (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Crack-free Hastelloy X fabricated through laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) from powder with a standard chemical composition is reported. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis evidenced columnar grains parallel to the building direction. The typical LPBF columnar dendrite microstructure was found to be finer than reported elsewhere. Mo-enriched carbides (~50 nm), presumed to play an important role in the cracking behavior of the alloy, were confirmed along interdendritic regions. Crack-free condition was maintained after heat treatment at 1177 °C for 1 h followed by water quenching, and the resulting microstructure was analyzed.

Keywords: Hastelloy X alloy; additive manufacturing; laser powder bed fusion (LPBF); microstructure; nickel alloys; scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Representative optical micrograph of stitched 50× images from the cross-section of an as-built cubic sample from its polished state.
Figure 2
Figure 2
(a) SEM montage of the cylindrical sample and higher magnification images of the (b) top, (c) middle, and (d) bottom of the sample. The regions where (bd) were taken from are highlighted on the montage.
Figure 3
Figure 3
(a) Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) map taken from the central region of the as-built sample and (b) its corresponding pole figure.
Figure 4
Figure 4
(a) SEM micrograph showing the typical columnar microstructure obtained from as-built LPBF Hastelloy X; (b) High magnification SEM micrograph; (c) Electron dispersive spectrometer (EDS) line scans corresponding to the region displayed above.
Figure 5
Figure 5
(a) EBSD map taken from the central region of the sample after heat treatment; and (b) its corresponding pole figure; SEM micrographs taken at (c) 5000× and (d) 1000× showing the microstructure of the sample after heat treatment.

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