Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2018 Aug;35(4):299-305.
doi: 10.2108/zs180025.

Release of Sticky Glycoproteins From Chlamydomonas Flagella During Microsphere Translocation on the Surface Membrane

Affiliations

Release of Sticky Glycoproteins From Chlamydomonas Flagella During Microsphere Translocation on the Surface Membrane

Ritsu Kamiya et al. Zoolog Sci. .

Abstract

Chlamydomonas flagella display surface motility such that small polystyrene beads (microspheres) attached to the flagellar membrane move bidirectionally along the flagellum. This surface motility enables cells to glide on a solid substrate to which they are attached by the flagellar surface. Previous studies suggested that microsphere movement and gliding motility result from the movement of transmembrane glycoprotein(s) within the plane of the plasma membrane, driven by intraflagellar transport (IFT), which utilizes cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-2. However, it is not well understood how a cell can continuously glide in one direction further than a single flagellar length. Here we show that, during microsphere translocation on the flagella of a non-motile mutant, pf18, some flagellar glycoproteins, including FMG-1B and FAP113, detach from the membrane and attach to the microspheres. We propose that such relocation of surface glycoproteins underlies the ability to glide over a long distance. Surface motility is likely common to cilia/flagella of various organisms, as a similar microsphere movement is observed in the apical ciliary tuft in sea urchin embryos.

Keywords: FAP113; FMG-1B; apical tuft cilia; cilia; gliding; sea urchin embryos; surface motility.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 1 article

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback