Chinese Version of Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Short Form Measures: Reliability, Validity, and Factorial Structure Assessment in Children With Cancer in China

Cancer Nurs. Nov/Dec 2019;42(6):430-438. doi: 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000633.

Abstract

Background: The Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed to measure symptoms and functions of children with a variety of chronic diseases. As the Chinese version of pediatric PROMIS (C-Ped-PROMIS) measures was developed, the measurement properties of C-Ped-PROMIS have not been demonstrated.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the reliability, validity, and factorial structure of the C-Ped-PROMIS measures in children with cancer in China.

Methods: A total of 272 children and adolescents were recruited from 3 hospitals in China. The 8 C-Ped-PROMIS measures and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory General Core Module and Cancer Module were administered in a cross-sectional design. Known-group validity, concurrent validity, and item and scale reliability of these 8 measures were examined by using SPSS 21.0, and factorial structures were tested by using confirmatory factor analysis with Mplus 7.1.

Results: All 8 C-Ped-PROMIS measures showed good known-group validity as hypothesized (P < .05) and good concurrent validity measured by significant correlations with the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory General Core Module and Cancer Module; the correlation coefficients ranged from r = 0.519 to r = 0.655, except for peer relationship with r = 0.255 and r = 0.136, respectively. The Cronbach's α of C-Ped-PROMIS ranged from .758 to .910, and model-estimated scale reliabilities ranged from 0.740 to 0.905. The confirmatory factor analysis models of each measure fit data very well.

Conclusions: All 8 C-Ped-PROMIS measures have a valid factorial structure as theoretically defined with good reliability and validity.

Implications for practice: The C-Ped-PROMIS can be readily used to measure symptoms and functions of children and adolescents with cancer in China.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Asian Continental Ancestry Group / psychology*
  • Child
  • China
  • Chronic Disease / psychology*
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Factor Analysis, Statistical
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Neoplasms / psychology*
  • Patient Reported Outcome Measures*
  • Psychometrics / methods*
  • Quality of Life / psychology*
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Translations