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. 2018 Aug;97(34):e12068.
doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000012068.

Uterine Dimensions in Gravida 0 Phase According to Age, Body Mass Index, and Height in Chinese Infertile Women

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Free PMC article

Uterine Dimensions in Gravida 0 Phase According to Age, Body Mass Index, and Height in Chinese Infertile Women

Hong Gao et al. Medicine (Baltimore). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to describe the size and the shape of gravida-0 uteri in infertile Chinese Han women according to age, height, and body mass index (BMI).Registered data obtained from the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, were collected and analyzed. The length, width, and anteroposterior diameter of the uteri of nonpregnant women aged 20 to 45 years were measured by transvaginal ultrasonography. Statistical analyses among different populations were conducted using a 1-way analysis of variance analysis or a Kruskal-Wallis H test.A total of 5726 primary infertile women were enrolled. The mean age of the sample group was 29.18 ± 4.22 years, and the mean BMI and the mean height of them were 21.51 ± 2.91 kg/m and 158.13 ± 4.71 cm, respectively. The mean uterine length, width, anteroposterior diameter, and L/W ratio were 49.33 ± 7.00 mm, 39.94 ± 7.23 mm, 44.95 ± 8.11 mm, and 1.2662 ± 0.2465, respectively. There were a statistically significant positive correlations between uterine length, width, anteroposterior diameter, and age in infertile women (all P < .001). Uterine L/W ratio gradually decreased with age, which was statistically significant (P < .001). The correlations between uterine length, width, anteroposterior diameter, and height were also considered statistically significant (all P < .001), while there was no correlation between L/W ratio and height. The results showed that uterine size and BMI had no statistical significance.The uterine length, width, and anteroposterior diameter gradually increased with increased age and height, but the increasing extents was different, and the uterine shape became rounder with age and had not changed with height in primary infertile women.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that there are no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Correlation between uterine length and age in primary infertile women.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Correlation between uterine width and age in primary infertile women.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Correlation between uterine length and height in primary infertile women.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Correlation between uterine width and height in primary infertile women.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Correlation between uterine anteroposterior diameter and height in primary infertile women.

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