Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 7 (8), e797-e804
eCollection

Associated Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Fibular Collateral Ligament Reconstruction With Single Femoral Tunnel and Asymmetric Hamstring Tendon Graft

Affiliations

Associated Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Fibular Collateral Ligament Reconstruction With Single Femoral Tunnel and Asymmetric Hamstring Tendon Graft

Alejandro Espejo-Baena et al. Arthrosc Tech.

Abstract

A technique for associated anterior cruciate ligament and fibular collateral ligament reconstruction is shown, using a single hamstring tendon graft, which is prepared asymmetrically, leaving one-third of the length with a single diameter and two-thirds with a double diameter. A single femoral tunnel is created, using an interference screw for fixation and isolation of the grafts. A suspension device is used for tibial fixation, allowing for length adjustment according to the graft's length. The objective of this Technical Note is to provide the orthopaedic surgeon with a resource for anterior cruciate ligament and fibular collateral ligament reconstruction even with short grafts, saving bone stock and avoiding the need for allografts.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1
The technique on a right knee. A suspension device attached to its G-Lok XL expansion device is used for tibial fixation, and an interference screw is employed for the femoral one. The remnant of the graft is used for the fibular collateral ligament reconstruction, which is fixed to the fibular head with a smaller interference screw.
Fig 2
Fig 2
Arthroscopic examination of the right knee (arthroscope through the central portal, probe via the anteromedial one). (A) An increase of the tibiofemoral gap is found on the lateral compartment. (B) Exploration of the popliteus tendon in the lateral recess, which is intact. (LFC, lateral femoral condyle; LM, lateral meniscus; LTP, lateral tibial plateau; PT, popliteus tendon.)
Fig 3
Fig 3
Graft prepared with a single-diameter end for lateral collateral ligament reconstruction and a double-diameter end for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The white arrow shows the G-Lok suspension device, the black arrow shows the expansion piece of the suspension device, and the arrowhead shows the suspension device's traction thread. (ACLG, anterior cruciate ligament graft; LCLG, lateral collateral ligament graft.)
Fig 4
Fig 4
Lateral aspect of the right knee. Fibular tunnel drilling, in the anteroposterior, lateromedial, and craniocaudal direction. The white asterisk shows the fibular head, and the arrow shows the periosteotome protecting the posterior aspect of the fibular head to protect the peroneal nerve. (LE, lateral epicondyle.)
Fig 5
Fig 5
Lateral aspect of the right knee. A looped lace is set through the fibular tunnel to pass the fibular collateral ligament through the tunnel afterward. The arrow shows the traction thread. (FH, fibular head; LE, lateral epicondyle.)
Fig 6
Fig 6
Attachment of the suspension device to its expansion piece. The black arrow shows the suspension device's plate, and the white arrow shows the expansion piece. (MP, medial portal.)
Fig 7
Fig 7
Lateral aspect of the right knee. The long single-diameter end that will serve as the fibular collateral ligament graft is exposed over the skin before being passed under the fascia lata. The black arrow shows the anterolateral incision over the fibular head to create the fibular tunnel, the green arrow shows the extra-articular end of the femoral tunnel, and the blue arrow shows the fibular collateral ligament graft. (FH, fibular head.)
Fig 8
Fig 8
Medial aspect of the right knee. Tibial fixation of the anterior cruciate ligament graft can be seen through the approach made to harvest the autologous hamstring tendon and to drill the tibial tunnel. The arrow shows the suspension device with its expansion piece leaning against the anterior tibial cortex. (MP, medial portal.)
Fig 9
Fig 9
Lateral aspect of the right knee. Femoral fixation of both the anterior cruciate ligament and the fibular collateral ligament grafts is performed using a single interference screw. The arrow shows the fibular collateral ligament graft. (E, epicondyle.)
Fig 10
Fig 10
Lateral aspect of the right knee. The remnant of the graft, which will serve as the fibular collateral ligament graft, is passed percutaneously under the iliotibial band in the craniocaudal direction to the anterolateral approach over the fibular head. The white arrow shows the fibular collateral ligament graft, and the black arrow shows the tip of the clamp seen through the anterolateral incision over the fibular head carrying the graft's traction thread. (FH, fibular head.)
Fig 11
Fig 11
The fibular collateral ligament (FCL) graft's traction thread is passed through the looped lace, which had been previously set through the fibular head. The black arrow shows the FCL graft; the white arrow shows the looped lace to pass the FCL graft through the fibular tunnel; and the arrowhead shows that the traction thread of the short arm of the graft, which served to double the diameter of the anterior cruciate ligament graft, has not been removed yet. (E, epicondyle; FH, fibular head.)
Fig 12
Fig 12
An interference screw 1 mm wider than the diameter of the tunnel. The graft is placed for fibular fixation of the fibular collateral ligament. The arrow shows the remaining graft after being passed through the fibular tunnel; the arrowhead shows that the traction thread of the short arm of the graft, which served to double the diameter of the anterior cruciate ligament graft, has not been removed yet. (E, epicondyle; FH, fibular head.)

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Trojani C., Sbihi A., Djian P. Causes for failure of ACL reconstruction and influence of meniscectomies after revision. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2011;19:196–201. - PubMed
    1. Wright R.W., Huston L.J., Spindler K.P. Descriptive epidemiology of the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) Cohort. Am J Sports Med. 2010;38:1979–1986. - PMC - PubMed
    1. LaPrade R.F., Resig S., Wentorf F., Lewis J.L. The effects of grade III posterolateral knee complex injuries on anterior cruciate ligament graft force. Am J Sports Med. 1999;27:469–475. - PubMed
    1. Cook S., Ridley T.J., McCarthy M.A. Surgical treatment of multiligament knee injuries. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2015;23:2983–2991. - PubMed
    1. Dwyer T., Whelan D. Anatomical considerations in multiligament knee injury and surgery. J Knee Surg. 2012;25:263–274. - PubMed
Feedback