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, 12, 142-154
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Effects of a Mobile Educational Program for Colorectal Cancer Patients Undergoing the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery

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Effects of a Mobile Educational Program for Colorectal Cancer Patients Undergoing the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery

Bo-Yeoul Kim et al. Open Nurs J.

Abstract

Background: The Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) program hastens recovery from colorectal cancer by shortening the treatment period and enabling a return to normal activities. However, patients with colorectal cancer treated under the ERAS program have fewer opportunities to consult with medical staff and receive education regarding self-care and experience more affective stress and anxiety.

Objective: This study aimed to develop and assess an educational program for patients with colorectal cancer treated under the ERAS program, considering affective aspects.

Method: Patients with colorectal cancer (n = 118) who underwent open colon surgery under the ERAS program were assigned alternately in the order of admission on a 1:1 basis to a treatment group (n = 59) and conventional care group (n = 59). The treatment group received a two-week mobile-based intervention, whereas the control group received conventional care. Quality of life, self-efficacy, anxiety, and depression were compared between the two groups.

Results: The mobile web-based educational program significantly reduced the negative impact of surgery on the quality of life in the treatment group, compared with the conventional care group, and triggered a noticeable decline in anxiety and depression and increase in self-efficacy.

Conclusion: The developed mobile web-based educational program effectively enhanced self-efficacy, positively impacted the quality of life, and reduced anxiety and depression. The program could have a positive effect on the quality of life of patients with colorectal cancer treated under the ERAS program.

Keywords: Anxiety; Colorectal cancer; Depression; Education; Quality of life; Self-efficacy.

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