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. 2018 Sep 1;15(9):1899.
doi: 10.3390/ijerph15091899.

Implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Children and Youth With Cerebral Palsy: Global Initiatives Promoting Optimal Functioning

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Free PMC article

Implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Children and Youth With Cerebral Palsy: Global Initiatives Promoting Optimal Functioning

Verónica Schiariti et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Core Sets for children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP) offer service providers and stakeholders a specific framework to explore functioning and disability for assessment, treatment, evaluation, and policy purposes in a global context. Objective: Describe global initiatives applying the ICF Core Sets for children and youth with CP, with a focus on contributions to clinical practice and challenges in their implementation. Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Ongoing initiatives applying the ICF Core Sets for CP in Russia, Poland, Malawi, and Brazil are included. Results: The main contributions of applying the ICF Core Sets for children and youth with CP include: (1) an objective description of abilities and limitations in everyday activities; (2) a consistent identification of facilitators and barriers influencing functioning; (3) a practical communication tool promoting client-centered care and multidisciplinary teamwork; and, (4) a useful guideline for measurement selection. The main challenges of adopting the ICF Core Sets are related to lack of ICF knowledge requiring intense training and translating results from standardized measures into the ICF qualifiers in a consistent way. Conclusions: Global initiatives include research and clinical applications at the program, service and system levels. The ICF Core Sets for CP are useful tools to guide service provision and build profiles of functioning and disability. Global interprofessional collaboration, capacity training, and informatics (e-records) will maximize their applications and accelerate adoption.

Keywords: ICF Core Sets; abilities; cerebral palsy; child; disability; functioning; global health; service provision.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Core Sets for children and youth with Cerebral Palsy.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Functioning profile of the Brazilian children with cerebral palsy (CP). The ICF qualifiers use to create the profile of functioning of this study sample represent the qualifiers that have the highest percentage within each ICF category. This profile of functioning was built while using the ICF-based documentation form on this web page https://icf-core-sets.org/es/page0.php courtesy ICF Research Branch.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Functioning profile of the Russian children, GMFCS levels I to III. The ICF qualifiers use to create the profile of functioning of this study sample represent the qualifiers that have the highest percentage within each ICF category.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Functioning profile of the Russian children, GMFCS levels IV to V. The ICF qualifiers use to create the profile of functioning of this study sample represent the qualifiers that have the highest percentage within each ICF category.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Service delivery model based on the ICF bio-psychosocial model at the Step by Step Association for help of disabled children in Zamość (Poland).

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