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Comparative Study
, 26 (1), 30-6

Computer-managed Instruction: An Alternative Teaching Strategy

  • PMID: 3029349
Comparative Study

Computer-managed Instruction: An Alternative Teaching Strategy

R Day et al. J Nurs Educ.

Abstract

Computer-managed instruction is an instructional strategy whereby the computer is used to provide learning objectives, learning resources, and assessment of learner performance. Computer-managed instruction (CMI) aids the instructor in instructional management without actually doing the teaching. Central CMI themes discussed in the literature are individualization, behavioral objectives, and educational technology. The main objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of two teaching strategies: CMI versus the traditional lecture method. The learning objectives were based on specified theoretical content from a Health Assessment course for baccalaureate nursing students. The design of the study was quasi-experimental incorporating two experimental treatments applied to two groups on two occasions. Data analysis addresses differences between groups using CMI and the traditional lecture method. The variables examined were the cognitive performance of learners, the learner's attitude toward the instructional strategy, the learner's retention of knowledge, the time involved in mastering the learning objectives, and the relationship between learner characteristics and the effectiveness of the instructional strategy. No significant mean difference (p less than 0.05) was found between groups on cognitive performance as measured by written and practical examination scores. For these first-year baccalaureate nursing students, CMI did not prove to be a positive instructional method as assessed by the Attitude Questionnaire. The majority of students preferred a combination of instructional methods. There was no significant difference between groups in the time spent meeting the learning objectives by either teaching strategy. The findings suggested that these students preferred learning strategies that are traditional in nature and teacher directed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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