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Review
. 2018 Oct 14;24(38):4330-4340.
doi: 10.3748/wjg.v24.i38.4330.

Towards Hepatitis C Virus Elimination: Egyptian Experience, Achievements and Limitations

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Free PMC article
Review

Towards Hepatitis C Virus Elimination: Egyptian Experience, Achievements and Limitations

Dalia Omran et al. World J Gastroenterol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Worldwide, more than one million people die each year from hepatitis C virus (HCV) related diseases, and over 300 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B or C. Egypt used to be on the top of the countries with heavy HCV burden. Some countries are making advances in elimination of HCV, yet multiple factors preventing progress; remain for the majority. These factors include lack of global funding sources for treatment, late diagnosis, poor data, and inadequate screening. Treatment of HCV in Egypt has become one of the top national priorities since 2007. Egypt started a national treatment program intending to provide cure for Egyptian HCV-infected patients. Mass HCV treatment program had started using Pegylated interferon and ribavirin between 2007 and 2014. Yet, with the development of highly-effective direct acting antivirals (DAAs) for HCV, elimination of viral hepatitis has become a real possibility. The Egyptian National Committee for the Control of Viral Hepatitis did its best to provide Egyptian HCV patients with DAAs. Egypt adopted a strategy that represents a model of care that could help other countries with high HCV prevalence rate in their battle against HCV. This review covers the effects of HCV management in Egyptian real life settings and the outcome of different treatment protocols. Also, it deals with the current and future strategies for HCV prevention and screening as well as the challenges facing HCV elimination and the prospect of future eradication of HCV.

Keywords: Direct acting antivirals; Egypt; Elimination; Hepatitis C virus; Limitations; Screening.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict-of-interest statement: No potential conflicts of interest. No financial support.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Frequency distribution of different hepatitis C virus genotypes in Egypt.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Timeline of hepatitis C virus prevalence in Egypt among adults.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Management of hepatitis C virus patients in Egyptian viral hepatitis treatment centers. DAAs: Direct acting antivirals.

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