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Oral Intake of Collagen Peptide Attenuates Ultraviolet B Irradiation-Induced Skin Dehydration In Vivo by Regulating Hyaluronic Acid Synthesis

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Oral Intake of Collagen Peptide Attenuates Ultraviolet B Irradiation-Induced Skin Dehydration In Vivo by Regulating Hyaluronic Acid Synthesis

Min Cheol Kang et al. Int J Mol Sci.

Abstract

Collagen peptide (CP) has beneficial effects on functions of the skin, such as skin barrier function and skin elasticity, in vivo. However, there are few studies investigating the mechanism underlying the potential effects of CP in skin epidermal moisturization after ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. In this study, we examined whether orally-administered CP affects the loss of skin hydration induced by UVB irradiation in hairless mice. SKH-1 hairless mice were orally administered CP at two doses (500 and 1000 mg/kg) for nine weeks, and the dorsal skin was exposed to UVB. The potential effects of CP were evaluated by measuring the transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, wrinkle formation, and hyaluronic acid expression in the dorsal mice skin. We found that oral administration of CP increased skin hydration and decreased wrinkle formation compared to the UVB-irradiated group. Treatment of CP increased the mRNA and protein expression of hyaluronic acid synthases (HAS-1 and -2) concomitant with an increased hyaluronic acid production in skin tissue. The expression of hyaluronidase (HYAL-1 and 2) mRNA was downregulated in the CP-treated group. In addition, the protein expression of skin-hydrating factors, filaggrin and involucrin, was upregulated via oral administration of CP. In summary, these results show that oral administration of CP increases hyaluronic acid levels, which decreases during UVB photoaging. Therefore, we suggest that CP can be used as a nutricosmetic ingredient with potential effects on UVB-induced skin dehydration and moisture loss in addition to wrinkle formation.

Keywords: Collagen peptide; Hyaluronic acid; Photoaging; SKH-1; Skin hydration; ultraviolet B.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Effect of oral administration of collagen peptide on TEWL, hydration, and epidermal thickness in the dorsal skin of UVB-irradiated hairless mice. (A) Body weight changes, (B) TEWL, and (C) stratum corneum water content after repeated irradiation with UVB were measured using the Derma Combo System; (D) hematoxylin and eosin staining. Scale bar = 100 μm. Arrows indicate the thickness of epidermis; (E) histogram of hematoxylin and eosin staining. The values are shown as mean ± SEM (n = 8). ### p < 0.001 (vs. control mice). * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, and *** p < 0.001 (vs. UVB-irradiated mice).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Effects of oral administration of collagen peptide on hyaluronic acid content, HAS isoenzymes, and hyaluronidase mRNA and protein expression in UVB-irradiated hairless mice. (A) Hyaluronic acid content in the dermis 9 weeks after UVB irradiation. mRNA levels of (B) HAS1, (C) HAS2, (D) HYAL1, and (E) HYAL2 were estimated by real-time PCR; (F) Western blotting and (G,H) relative densities of HAS1 and HAS2. The values are shown as mean ± SEM (n = 8). # p < 0.05, ## p < 0.01, and ### p < 0.001 (vs. control mice). * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, and *** p < 0.001 (vs. UVB-irradiated mice).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Effect of oral administration of collagen peptide on the expression of filaggrin and involucrin in the dorsal skin of UVB-irradiated mice. (A) Western blotting and (B,C) relative densities of filaggrin and involucrin. The values are shown as mean ± SEM (n = 8). ## p < 0.01 (vs. control mice). * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, and *** p < 0.001 (vs. UVB-irradiated mice).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Effect of oral administration of collagen peptide on visible skin condition and wrinkle formation in UVB-induced hairless mice. (A) Photographs of a skin surface and replica impression of the mouse dorsal skin. Scale bar = 5 mm; (B) histogram of dorsal wrinkle using a video camera and calculated image analysis. The values are shown as mean ± SEM (n = 8). ### p < 0.001 (vs. control mice). * p < 0.05 (vs. UVB-irradiated mice).

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