Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
. 2019 Jan 29;44(2):73-89.
doi: 10.1093/chemse/bjy068.

Cannabinoids, Chemical Senses, and Regulation of Feeding Behavior

Affiliations
Review

Cannabinoids, Chemical Senses, and Regulation of Feeding Behavior

Ernesto Tarragon et al. Chem Senses. .

Abstract

The herb Cannabis sativa has been traditionally used in many cultures and all over the world for thousands of years as medicine and recreation. However, because it was brought to the Western world in the late 19th century, its use has been a source of controversy with respect to its physiological effects as well as the generation of specific behaviors. In this regard, the CB1 receptor represents the most relevant target molecule of cannabinoid components on nervous system and whole-body energy homeostasis. Thus, the promotion of CB1 signaling can increase appetite and stimulate feeding, whereas blockade of CB1 suppresses hunger and induces hypophagia. Taste and flavor are sensory experiences involving the oral perception of food-derived chemicals and drive a primal sense of acceptable or unacceptable for what is sampled. Therefore, research within the last decades focused on deciphering the effect of cannabinoids on the chemical senses involved in food perception and consequently in the pattern of feeding. In this review, we summarize the data on the effect of cannabinoids on chemical senses and their influences on food intake control and feeding behavior.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 1 article

Publication types

Substances

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback