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, 27 (6), 1719-1726
eCollection

Antioxidant Properties of a Vegetable-Fruit Beverage Fermented With Two Lactobacillus plantarum Strains

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Antioxidant Properties of a Vegetable-Fruit Beverage Fermented With Two Lactobacillus plantarum Strains

Xiaoxing Yang et al. Food Sci Biotechnol.

Abstract

Fermented vegetable-fruit beverages are a popular fermented food, with many potential health benefits. In this study, two commercial Lactobacillus plantarum strains were selected to ferment a beverage containing apples, pears, and carrots. The metabolites and antioxidant activities were examined during the fermentation process. Results showed that lactic acid and acetic acid accumulated gradually, whereas malic acid decreased. Glucose and fructose increased from 0.48 and 14.8 g/L to 7.7 and 20.8 g/L, respectively, while sucrose decreased slightly. Ascorbic acid also increased continuously during the fermentation to 90.74 mg/100 mL. DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity and FRAP reached their maximum value after 4-8 days. The accumulation of TPC, TFC, and SOD reached their maximum value on the 8th day of fermentation. Our study revealed that the L. plantarum-fermented vegetable-fruit beverage showed significant antioxidant activity, which is helpful in evaluating the fermentation end-point and developing a high-quality fermented beverage.

Keywords: Antioxidant activities; Fermentation; Lactobacillus plantarum; Metabolites; Vegetable–fruit beverage.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
The amount of microbial (lactic acid bacteria) (A), pH and total titratable acidity (B) during fermentation of the vegetable–fruit beverage. The average from the three plates recorded for each serial dilution. Results represent the means of three independent trials (n = 3). Error bars represent standard deviation values
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Changes of organic acid and sugar levels during fermentation of the vegetable–fruit beverage. (A) Represents lactic acid, acetic acid, and malic acid. (B) Represents sucrose, fructose, glucose. Results are the means of three independent trials (n = 3). Error bars represent standard deviation values
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Changes in the levels of ascorbic acid and riboflavin during fermentation of the vegetable–fruit beverage (A). Changes in antioxidant activity during fermentation of the vegetable–fruit beverage (B) including DPPH free radical scavenging activity (square), ABTS free radical scavenging activity (circle), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (inverted triangle). Results are the means of three independent trials (n = 3). Error bars represent standard deviation values
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Changes in phenolics level, flavonoid content, and SOD activity during fermentation of the vegetable–fruit beverage. Phenolics (circle), flavonoids (inverted triangle), and SOD activity (square). Phenolics results expressed in mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per L of beverage and flavonoid results expressed in mg rutin equivalents per L of beverage. Results are the means of three independent trials (n = 3). Error bars represent standard deviation values

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