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Review
, 59 (2), 123-133

Bacteriophages: An Overview of the Control Strategies Against Multiple Bacterial Infections in Different Fields

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Review

Bacteriophages: An Overview of the Control Strategies Against Multiple Bacterial Infections in Different Fields

Muhsin Jamal et al. J Basic Microbiol.

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Abstract

Bacteriophages (phages/viruses) need host bacteria to replicate and propagate. Primarily, a bacteriophage contains a head/capsid to encapsidate the genetic material. Some phages contain tails. Phages encode endolysins to hydrolyze bacterial cell wall. The two main classes of phages are lytic or virulent and lysogenic or temperate. In comparison with antibiotics, to deal with bacterial infections, phage therapy is thought to be more effective. In 1921, the use of phages against bacterial infections was first demonstrated. Later on, in humans, phage therapy was used to treat skin infections caused by Pseudomonas species. Furthermore, phages were successfully employed against infections in animals - calves, lambs, and pigs infected with Escherichia coli. In agriculture, for instance, phages have successfully been used e.g., Apple blossom infection, caused by Erwinia amylovora, was effectively catered with the use of bacteriophages. Bacteriophages were also used to control E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, and Campylobacter contamination in food. Comparatively, phage display is a recently discovered technology, whereby, bacteriophages play a significant role. This review is an effort to collect almost recent and relevant information regarding applications and complications associated with the use of bacteriophages.

Keywords: bacteriophage; endolysins; lysogenic; lytic; phage therapy.

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