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, 2018, 6470534
eCollection

Sheng-Di-Da-Huang Decoction Inhibited Inflammation Expressed in Microglia After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

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Sheng-Di-Da-Huang Decoction Inhibited Inflammation Expressed in Microglia After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

Min Cai et al. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med.

Abstract

Objects: Sheng-Di-Da-Huang Decoction was used as an effective hemostatic agent in ancient China. However, its therapeutic mechanism is still not clear. Inflammatory injury plays a critical role in ICH-induced secondary brain injury. After hemolysis, hematoma components are released, inducing microglial activation via TLR4, which initiates the activation of transcription factors (such as NF-κB) to regulate expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes. This study aimed to verify the anti-inflammatory effects of Sheng-Di-Da-Huang Decoction on ICH rats.

Materials and methods: Intracerebral hemorrhage was induced by injection of bacterial collagenase (0.2 U) in rats. Neurological deficits, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, expression of TLR4, NF-κB, Iba-1 positive cells (activated microglia), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were examined 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after collagenase injection. MR images were also studied.

Results: Sheng-Di-Da-Huang Decoction remarkably improved neurological function, reduced brain water content as well as Evans blue extravasation, downregulated expression of TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, and IL-1β, and inhibited microglial activation.

Conclusions: Sheng-Di-Da-Huang Decoction reduced inflammation reaction after ICH through inhibited inflammation expressed in microglia.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
(a) Neurological deficit score (maximum total score is 13) of rats after injection of collagenase. (b) The result of corner turn test. Data were presented as mean ± SEM, n=5 rats for each group. ∗ P<0.05; ∗∗ <0.01 compared with ICH group.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Result of brain water contents for each group at different time points. Data were presented as mean ± SEM, n=5 rats for each group. ∗ P<0.05; ∗∗ <0.01 compared with ICH group.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Results of Evans blue extravasation in each group at different time points. Data were presented as mean ± SEM, n=5 rats for each group. ∗ P<0.05; ∗∗ <0.01 compared with ICH group.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Results of MRI study. The images, taken at the different time points, were from a single rat. (a) Representative T2-weighted MR images of intracerebral hematoma in rat brain at the level of the collagenase injection. (b) Representative SWI images of intracerebral hematoma in rat brains surrounding collagenase injection. n=5 rats for each group at each time point. The images were from different rats in the same group.
Figure 5
Figure 5
(a) Representative immunofluorescence images of Iba-1, ×200 magnified. (b) Iba-1 positive cells percentage (green fluorescence represents Iba-1 positive cell). Data were presented as mean ± SEM, n=5 rats for each group. ∗ P<0.05; ∗∗ <0.01 compared with ICH group.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Detection of TLR4 and NF-κB in the hemorrhagic area using Western blotting. (a) The bands of GAPDH, TLR4, and NF-κB at 1 day. (b) The bands of GAPDH, TLR4, and NF-κB at 3 days. (c) The bands of GAPDH, TLR4, and NF-κB at 7 days. (d) The bands of GAPDH, TLR4, and NF-κB at 14 days. (e) Quantitative results of the bands for TLR4 relative to GAPDH at each time point. (f) Quantitative results of the bands for NF-κB relative to GAPDH at each time point. Data are presented as mean ± SEM, n=5 rats for each group. ∗ P<0.05; ∗∗ <0.01 compared with ICH group. Results of TNF-α (g) and IL-1β (h) concentrations in each group at different time points. Data were presented as mean ± SEM, n=5 rats for each group. ∗ P<0.05; ∗∗ <0.01 compared with ICH group.

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