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, 67 (49), 1353-1357

Frequency of Use Among Middle and High School Student Tobacco Product Users - United States, 2015-2017

Frequency of Use Among Middle and High School Student Tobacco Product Users - United States, 2015-2017

Gabriella M Anic et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep.

Abstract

Tobacco product use during adolescence increases the risk for lifelong nicotine addiction and immediate adverse health effects (1,2). During 2011-2017, current use of cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, and pipe tobacco decreased significantly among middle and high school students, but current use of e-cigarettes increased significantly from 1.5% to 11.7% (3). In 2017, an estimated 19.6% of high school students (2.95 million) and 5.6% of middle school students (0.67 million) were current users of any tobacco product; e-cigarettes were the most commonly used tobacco product for both middle (3.3%) and high (11.7%) school students (3). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC analyzed combined data from the 2015-2017 National Youth Tobacco Surveys (NYTS) to determine past 30-day (current) frequency of use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, and hookahs among U.S. high school and middle school students. During 2015-2017, the proportion of students currently using tobacco products who used a product for ≥20 of the past 30 days ranged from 14.0% of cigar smokers to 38.7% of smokeless tobacco users among high school students and from 13.1% of e-cigarette users to 24.5% of hookah smokers among middle school students. Among current users, use of two or more tobacco products ranged from 76.7% (e-cigarettes) to 90.9% (hookahs) among those using the product ≥20 of the preceding 30 days, from 68.0% (e-cigarettes) to 84.2% (hookahs) among those using the product for 6 to 19 of the preceding 30 days, and from 48.8% (e-cigarettes) to 77.2% (cigarettes) among those using the product for 1 to 5 of the preceding 30 days. Sustained implementation of proven tobacco control strategies focusing on all types of tobacco products, in coordination with the regulation of tobacco products by FDA, are needed to reduce tobacco product initiation and use among U.S. youths.

Conflict of interest statement

All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE form for disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. No potential conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Figures

FIGURE
FIGURE
Percentage of middle and high school students who were current users of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, and hookahs, who reported multiple tobacco product use, by number of days used during the preceding 30 days — National Youth Tobacco Survey, United States, 2015–2017 * Multiple tobacco product use was defined as a current cigarette smoker, e-cigarette user, cigar smoker, smokeless tobacco user, or hookah smoker also using at least one of the following products in the past 30-days: cigarettes; cigars (cigars, cigarillos, or little cigars); smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip); e-cigarettes; hookahs; tobacco pipes; snus; dissolvable tobacco (dissolvables); and bidis.

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