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, 51 (4), 236-242

Schematic of Mean Thickness Distribution on the Lateral Aspect of the Canine Frontal Sinus as an Experimental Model of Sinus Surgery

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Schematic of Mean Thickness Distribution on the Lateral Aspect of the Canine Frontal Sinus as an Experimental Model of Sinus Surgery

Jung-Hee Bae et al. Anat Cell Biol.

Abstract

The dog frontal sinus may represent an alternative model dental implant research; its topographical resemblance to the maxillary sinus renders it a potentially favorable experimental environment. The aim of this study was thus to elucidate the anatomical configuration of the canine frontal sinus and histological characteristics, and to determine whether it could be a new canine experimental model for dental implant research. Twenty-four sides of canine frontal bones were harvested. The distance from the nasion to the emerging point of the lateral aspect of the canine frontal sinus was measured with the aid of Lucion software. The thicknesses of the canine frontal sinus wall were measured, and the two specimens stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The mean distance from the nasion to the emerging point of the lateral aspect of the canine frontal sinus was 16.0 mm. The mean thicknesses of the canine frontal bone at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 mm lateral to the midsagittal plane were 2.3, 2.7, 3.2, 3.8, and 3.7 mm, respectively. The canine frontal sinus was lined with pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium. These data suggest that the canine frontal sinus is a suitable alternative to the canine maxillary sinus as a model for studying various sinus augmentation protocols.

Keywords: Dog; Experimental study; Frontal sinus; Implantation; Sinus augmentation.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1. Parameters measured in the canine frontal bone and sinus with the aid of Lucion software. a, the distance from nasion (yellow asterisk) to the emerging point of the lateral aspect of the canine frontal sinus; b, the 16 coronal sections imaged from the emerging point of the lateral aspect of the canine frontal sinus in the posterior direction at 1-mm intervals. A, anterior; P, posterior; L, left; R, right.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2. The thickness of the canine frontal bone was measured at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 mm lateral to the midsagittal plane (double-headed arrows) at 3-mm intervals on each coronally sectioned image (CS1–CS16). A, anterior; P, posterior; L, left; R, right.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3. The thickness of the canine frontal sinus wall (mm).
Fig. 4
Fig. 4. Histological examination of the canine frontal sinus mucosa (A, ×400; B, ×1,000). Scale bars=50 µm (A), 200 µm (B). EP, epithelium; BM, basement membrane; LP, lamina propria.

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