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. 2019 Jul;32(7):1027-1035.
doi: 10.5713/ajas.18.0689. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Effect of Aged Garlic Powder on Physicochemical Characteristics, Texture Profiles, and Oxidative Stability of Ready-To-Eat Pork Patties

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Free PMC article

Effect of Aged Garlic Powder on Physicochemical Characteristics, Texture Profiles, and Oxidative Stability of Ready-To-Eat Pork Patties

Ji-Han Kim et al. Asian-Australas J Anim Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aged garlic powder (AGP) on physicochemical characteristics, texture profiles, and oxidative stability of ready-to-eat (RTE) pork patties.

Methods: There were five treatment groups: a control; 1% fresh garlic powder (T1); 0.5%, 1%, and 2% AGP (T2, T3, and T4). Pork patties with vacuum packaging were roasted at 71°C for core temperature, stored at 4°C for 14 d, and then reheated for 1 min using a microwave.

Results: The AGP groups showed a lower the level of lipid oxidation and higher thiol contents than the control and T1. The pH value of the control increased whereas that of aged garlic groups decreased after re-heating process. In addition, the redness significantly increased with increasing level of AGP whereas the redness of the control and T1 decreased after re-heating process. T4 added patties improved textural and sensory properties compared to the control.

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that AGP addition to RTE pork patties can improve their sensory characteristics and oxidative stability.

Keywords: Aged Garlic; Lipid Oxidation; Patties; Ready-to-eat; Thiol.

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

We certify that there is no conflict of interest with any financial organization regarding the material discussed in the manuscript.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Schematic figure showing experimental design of this study. Control, pork patties without fresh or aged garlic powder; T1, 1% fresh garlic (w/w), T2, T3, and T4, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% aged garlic (w/w).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Brown intensity of fresh, cooked and reheated pork patties added fresh/aged garlic powder. Control, pork patties without fresh or aged garlic powder; T1, 1% fresh garlic (w/w), T2, T3, and T4, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% aged garlic (w/w).

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