Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2019 Feb 5;11:17.
doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2019.00017. eCollection 2019.

Predictors of Source Memory Success and Failure in Older Adults

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Predictors of Source Memory Success and Failure in Older Adults

Selene Cansino et al. Front Aging Neurosci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Source memory decline has been identified as one of the types of memory most seriously affected during older age. It refers to our capacity to recollect the contextual information in which our experiences take place. Although most elderly adults will be affected by progressive source memory decline, a subset of individuals will not follow this average pattern; instead, their source memory capabilities will remain functional. Likewise, a minority of individuals will manifest an extreme decay of their source memory abilities. The objective of the present study was to identify among 120 potential predictors that significantly contributed to these two extreme source memory outcomes. Spatial source memory was measured in a sample of 519 healthy individuals between 61 and 80 years old. Individuals who performed below the 20th and above the 80th percentiles in the source memory task were defined as individuals whose episodic memory failed and succeeded, respectively. Logistic models identified five and six significant predictors of source memory success and failure in older age, respectively. High source memory performance was mainly predicted by healthy cardiovascular markers and psychological traits, whereas low source memory performance was primarily predicted by consumption habits and by less engagement in mental activities. The models identified relevant biological and life experiences that underlie these unusual source memory outcomes in older age.

Keywords: aging; episodic memory; logistic regression; recollection; source memory.

Figures

FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1
Mean performance in the source memory paradigm for the source memory success group (above the 80th percentile), for the source memory failure group (below the 20th percentile), and for individuals who performed between the extreme groups. Error bars represent the 95% confidence intervals for the mean.
FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2
Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for the source memory success model (left) and the source memory failure model (right). AUC, area under the curve.
FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3
Predictive probabilities of source memory success for each significant predictor. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals. MIA, Metamemory in Adulthood Scale. aLog-transformed variable. bTotal intake = frequency × duration.
FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4
Predictive probabilities of source memory failure for each significant predictor. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals. MIA, Metamemory in Adulthood Scale; fr, frequency. aLog-transformed variable. bTotal time = frequency × duration.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Albert M. S., Jones K., Savage C. R., Berkman L., Seeman T., Blazer D., et al. (1995). Predictors of cognitive change in older persons: macarthur studies of successful aging. Psychol. Aging 10 578–589. 10.1037/0882-7974.10.4.578 - DOI - PubMed
    1. Andrews G., Clark M., Luszcz M. (2002). Successful aging in the australian longitudinal study of aging: applying the macarthur model cross–nationally. J. Soc. Issues 58 749–765. 10.1111/1540-4560.00288 - DOI
    1. Annett M. (1970). A classification of hand preference by association analysis. Br. J. Psychol. 61 303–321. 10.1111/j.2044-8295.1970.tb01248.x - DOI - PubMed
    1. Arranz S., Chiva-Blanch G., Valderas-Martínez P., Medina-Remón A., Lamuela-Raventós R. M., Estruch R. (2012). Wine, beer, alcohol and polyphenols on cardiovascular disease and cancer. Nutrients 4 759–781. 10.3390/nu4070759 - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Bäckman L., Small B. J., Fratiglioni L. (2001). Stability of the preclinical episodic memory deficit in alzheimer’s disease. Brain 124 96–102. 10.1093/brain/124.1.96 - DOI - PubMed

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback