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, 8 (2), 33-43

Associations of Renal Function With Diabetic Retinopathy and Visual Impairment in Type 2 Diabetes: A Multicenter Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

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Associations of Renal Function With Diabetic Retinopathy and Visual Impairment in Type 2 Diabetes: A Multicenter Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

Wisit Kaewput et al. World J Nephrol.

Abstract

Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) separately has been noted as a major public health problem worldwide as well. Currently, many studies have demonstrated an association between diabetic nephropathy and DR in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, but this association is less strong in T2DM. The evidence for an association between renal function and DR and visual impairment among T2DM patients is limited, particularly in the Asian population.

Aim: To assess the association between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and DR, severe DR, and severe visual impairment among T2DM patients in Thailand.

Methods: We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study based on the DM/HT study of the Medical Research Network of the Consortium of Thai Medical Schools. This study evaluated adult T2DM patients from 831 public hospitals in Thailand in the year 2013. GFR was categorized into ≥ 90, 60-89, 30-59 and < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. The association between GFR and DR, severe DR, and severe visual impairment were assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

Results: A total of 13192 T2DM patients with available GFR were included in the analysis. The mean GFR was 66.9 ± 25.8 mL/min/1.73 m2. The prevalence of DR, proliferative DR, diabetic macular edema, and severe visual impairment were 12.4%, 1.8%, 0.2%, and 2.1%, respectively. Patients with GFR of 60-89, 30-59 and < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 were significantly associated with increased DR and severe DR when compared with patients with GFR of ≥ 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. In addition, increased severe visual impairment was associated with GFR 30-59 and < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2.

Conclusion: Decreased GFR was independently associated with increased DR, severe DR, and severe visual impairment. GFR should be monitored in diabetic patients for DR awareness and prevention.

Keywords: Diabetic retinopathy; Glomerular filtration rate; Type 2 diabetes; Visual impairment.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict-of-interest statement: The authors deny any conflict of interest.

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