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. 2019 Feb;31(2):170-174.
doi: 10.1589/jpts.31.170. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

A Study on Muscle Activity Based on the Ankle Posture for Effective Exercise With Indoor Horse Riding Machine

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A Study on Muscle Activity Based on the Ankle Posture for Effective Exercise With Indoor Horse Riding Machine

Hyun-Ju Noh et al. J Phys Ther Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

[Purpose] Although much researches have been conducted on the hippotherapy, the intervention methods of the previous studies focus on the pelvis posture. Thus, this study analyzed the electromyogram (EMG) of trunk muscle and lower limb muscle to analyze the kinetic factors. Based on the analysis, this study aims to compare the muscle load and suggest effective exercise method. [Participants and Methods] This study checked the muscle activity of Rectus abdominis (RA), Erector spinae (ES), Rectus femoris (RF), Adductor magnus (AM) during the exercise using horse riding machine in dorsiflexion position by bending 20 degrees and in neutral position. Each position was performed for 5 minutes and the speed of the horse riding machine was set to medium speed. [Results] Rectus abdominis showed higher muscle activity in dorsiflexion position and the groups had significant differences. Elector spinae showed higher muscle activity in dorsiflexion position and the groups had significant differences. Rectus femoris showed higher muscle activity in dorsiflexion position and the groups had significant differences. Adductor magnus also showed higher muscle activity in dorsiflexion position and the groups had significant differences. [Conclusions] The study result showed that exercise with horse riding machine in dorsiflexion position activates trunk muscle and thigh muscle effectively. Thus, the study suggests more effective posture for the modern people who exercise with horse riding machine for strengthening physical health.

Keywords: Electrogoniometer; Electromyography; Hippotherapy.

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