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Randomized Controlled Trial
, 47 (5), 2026-2033

Effect of Multimodal Intervention on Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Gynecological Laparoscopy

Affiliations
Randomized Controlled Trial

Effect of Multimodal Intervention on Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Gynecological Laparoscopy

Kai Ma et al. J Int Med Res.

Abstract

Objective: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common complication in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery, and achieving good results is difficult with a single antiemetic method. This study investigated whether multimodal intervention can reduce PONV in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

Methods: A total of 153 patients who underwent gynecological laparoscopic surgery were randomized into the control group and multimodal group. Patients in the multimodal group received dexmedetomidine 1 µg/kg intravenously 15 minutes before induction of anesthesia. A bilateral transversus abdominis plane block was performed with 0.375% ropivacaine 30 mL after induction of anesthesia. Scores of postoperative nausea and vomiting, the visual analog scale, and the Bruggemann comfort scale (BCS) were assessed 24 hours postoperatively.

Results: Nausea and vomiting scores were significantly lower at 2, 6, and 24 hours in the multimodal group compared with the control group. BCS scores were significantly higher at 0 to 24 hours in the multimodal group compared with the control group.

Conclusions: Multimodal intervention improves PONV and increases patients' comfort. The multimodal approach can also enhance recovery after gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

Keywords: Postoperative nausea and vomiting; anesthesia; gynecological laparoscopy; multimodal intervention; surgery; transversus abdominis plane block.

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