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. 2019 Jun;49(6):2597-2604.
doi: 10.1007/s10803-019-03998-y.

Brief Report: Sex/Gender Differences in Symptomology and Camouflaging in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Free PMC article

Brief Report: Sex/Gender Differences in Symptomology and Camouflaging in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Rachel K Schuck et al. J Autism Dev Disord. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is more prevalent in males than females. Previous research indicates females camouflage ASD symptoms more than males, potentially contributing to the difference in prevalence. This study investigated sex/gender differences in behavioral phenotypes in 17 males and 11 females with ASD, as well camouflaging in ASD, in an attempt to partially replicate findings from Lai et al. (Autism 21(6):690-702, 2017). Overall ASD symptoms were measured by the autism spectrum quotient (AQ). Mean AQ in females with ASD was higher than males with ASD, with the difference approaching statistical significance. Camouflaging was found to be more common in females with ASD, and not associated to social phobia. Furthermore, camouflaging correlated negatively with emotional expressivity in females, but not males, with ASD. These findings strengthen previous findings regarding camouflaging being more common in females and add to the literature on how camouflaging may be different in females versus males.

Keywords: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD); Camouflaging; Sex/gender differences.

Conflict of interest statement

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest All authors declare they have no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
a Correlation between camouflaging and BEQ emotional expressivity in males and females with ASD. The correlation was significant in females (r = − 0.607, p = 0.048), but not males (r = 0.039, p = 0.891). b Correlation between camouflaging and BEQ positive emotionality in males and females with ASD. The correlation was significant in females (r = − 0.676, p = 0.022), but not males (r = − 0.224, p = 0.422)

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