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. 2018 Dec;41(12):2331-2336.
doi: 10.1002/ceat.201800258. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Recovery of Furfural and Acetic Acid From Wood Hydrolysates in Biotechnological Downstream Processing

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Free PMC article

Recovery of Furfural and Acetic Acid From Wood Hydrolysates in Biotechnological Downstream Processing

Nadia Galeotti et al. Chem Eng Technol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Wood hydrolysates contain sugars that can be used as feedstock in fermentation processes. For that purpose, the hydrolysate must be concentrated and inhibitors that harm fermentation must be removed. Herein, the integration of these tasks with the recovery of inhibitors is studied. The wood hydrolysate is represented as a mixture of water, xylose, acetic acid, and furfural. Acetic acid and furfural are two frequently occurring inhibitors and valuable chemicals, and thus, their recovery is studied. Furfural is recovered from the vapors by heteroazeotropic distillation. It is shown that this can be achieved without additional energy. The recovery of acetic acid by distillation is also possible, but not attractive. The new process is simulated by using a thermodynamic model based on experimental data.

Keywords: Acetic acid; Furfural; Heteroazeotropic distillation; Wood hydrolysates.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Process scheme for the recovery of F. Vapor from the evaporator (EVAP) is fed directly to the bottom of a rectification column (COL), which has no reboiler. B, bottom stream; D, distillate stream; DEC, decanter; L, liquid stream exiting the evaporator; P, product stream; R, reflux stream; V, vapor stream exiting the evaporator.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Process scheme for the recovery of F and AA. S, side draw.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Scheme of VLLE of the system (W + X + AA + F). The dimerization of AA is considered in the gas phase only.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Residue curves map (20.0 kPa), including the liquid‐liquid phase envelope (298.15 K), for the ternary system (W + AA + F). Solid line, residue curve; dashed line, phase envelope; ×‐·‐×, tie lines.
Figure 5
Figure 5
F recovery rate in the heteroazeotropic distillation of the F recovery process (cf. Fig. 1) as a function of the number of equilibrium stages N (p = 20 kPa, the column feed is specified in Tab. 3).
Figure 6
Figure 6
N‐Q curve for the heteroazeotropic distillation of the F and AA recovery process (cf. Fig. 2; p = 20 kPa, the column feed is specified in Tab. 4). N is the total number of stages and Q·R is the reboiler duty.

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