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, 24 (2), 226-244

Enhancing Stress Management Coping Skills Using Induced Affect and Collaborative Daily Assessment

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Enhancing Stress Management Coping Skills Using Induced Affect and Collaborative Daily Assessment

Jessica A Chen et al. Cogn Behav Pract.

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the use of induced affect (IA) and collaborative (therapeutic) assessment (CA) as components of Cognitive-Affective Stress Management Training (CASMT). IA is a technique for rehearsing cognitive and physical relaxationcoping skills under conditions of high affective arousal, which has been shown to result in high levels of coping self-efficacy. CA provides diary-based feedback to clients about the processes underlying theirstress experiences and helps identify affect-arousing experiences to be targeted by IA. We include descriptions of the IA technique and anonline stress and coping daily diary, as well as sample transcripts illustrating how CA is integrated into CASMT and how IA evokes high affective arousal and skills rehearsal. To illustrate idiographic assessment, we also describe threetreatment cases involving female clients between the ages of 20 and 35 with anxiety symptoms who participated in six weeks of CASMT and reported their daily stress and coping experiences (before, during, and following the intervention)for a total of ten weeks. The resulting time series data, analyzed using Simulation Modeling Analysis (SMA), revealed that all clients reported improved negative affect regulation over the course of treatment, yet they exhibited idiographic patterns of change on other outcome and coping skills variables. These results illustrate how IA and CA may be used to enhance emotional self-regulation and how time-series analyses can identify idiographic aspects of treatment response that would not be evident in group data.

Keywords: affect elicitation; collaborative assessment; coping skills rehearsal; stress management.

Conflict of interest statement

Disclosure Statement The authors have no real or potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Conceptual model and interventions. (Smith, 2012)
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Examples of the integrated coping response. (Smith, 2012)
Figure 3a.
Figure 3a.
Ella’s self-reported affect regulation showed a significant increase from the skills acquisitionphase (M = 2.48) to the skills rehearsal phase (M = 3.80; r = .59, p = .0001).
Figure 3b.
Figure 3b.
Penelope’s self-reported affect regulation showed a significant increase from skills acquisition (M = 2.57) to skills rehearsal (M = 4.32; r = .58, p = .001).
Figure 3c.
Figure 3c.
Sarah’s self-reported affect regulation showed a significant increase from skills acquisition (M = 4.09) to skills rehearsal (M = 5.29; r = .48, p = .002).
Figure 4a.
Figure 4a.
Cross-lagged correlations showing directional and temporal relationships between relaxation skills use and perceived affect regulation for Ella.
Figure 4b.
Figure 4b.
Cross-lagged correlations showing directional and temporal relationships between relaxation skills use and perceived affect regulation for Penelope.
Figure 4c.
Figure 4c.
Cross-lagged correlations showing directional and temporal relationships between relaxation skills use and perceived affect regulation for Sarah.
Figure 5a.
Figure 5a.
Ella’s self-reported stress post-coping showed a significant decrease from skills acquisition (M = 1.56) to skills rehearsal (M = .60; r = .47, p = .006). Self-reported stress levels after the use of coping behaviors was assessed with the item: “How stressful was the event after engaging in coping behaviors?” (0 = Not at all stressful; 3 = Somewhat stressful; 6 = Extremely stressful).
Figure 5b.
Figure 5b.
Penelope’s self-reported life satisfaction showed a significant increase from skills acquisition (M = 5.24) to skills rehearsal (M = 7.31; r = .61, p = .03). Life satisfaction was assessed with the item: “Overall, how would you rate your general life satisfaction at this time?” (0 = Most unhappy; 10 = Most happy).

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