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, 31 (4), 306-309

Characteristics and Distributions of Myofascial Trigger Points in Individuals With Chronic Tension-Type Headaches

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Characteristics and Distributions of Myofascial Trigger Points in Individuals With Chronic Tension-Type Headaches

Uraiwan Chatchawan et al. J Phys Ther Sci.

Abstract

[Purpose] To investigate the characteristics and distributions of the myofascial trigger point (TrP) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the active TrP in individuals with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). [Participants and Methods] Fifty-three CTTH patients and 53 age and gender-matched individuals without CTTH (CON) were recruited. The TrPs and tenderness points were first identified by manual palpation, and the PPTs of the active TrPs were determined by using a manual algometer. [Results] The active TrP, latent TrP and tenderness point totals per person in the head, neck, shoulder and upper back in CTTH were 4.3 ± 2.1, 0.6 ± 1.0 and 1.9 ± 1.8, respectively, while those in CON were 0, 0.7 ± 1.5 and 1.9 ± 1.8, respectively. The PPT levels of the active TrPs were 0.7 ± 0.2 to 1.2 ± 0.6 kg/cm2 in the muscles of the head, neck, shoulder and upper back. A larger number of active TrPs and lower PPT levels of the active TrPs were found in the head, neck and shoulder regions than in the upper back region. [Conclusion] Lower PPTs of the active TrPs in the head, neck and shoulder regions could influence the individuals with CTTH.

Keywords: Head and neck pain; Myofascial tenderness; Pressure pain threshold.

Figures

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.
Location of trigger points in the head, neck, shoulder and upper back muscles. HNS: head, neck, and shoulder area where is from a top of head to C7; UB: upper back area where is from C7 to T7. 1) occipitofrontalis, 2) temporalis, 3) suboccipital, 4) sternocleidomastoid, 5) splenius capitis, 6) splenius cervicis, 7) semispinaliscapitis, 8) semispinaliscervicis, and 9) upper and 10) middle trapezius muscles.

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