Cost-effectiveness of public health interventions against human influenza pandemics in France: a methodological contribution from the FLURESP European Commission project

Eur J Public Health. 2020 Feb 1;30(1):43-49. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckz074.

Abstract

Background: The FLURESP project is a public health project funded by the European Commission with the objective to design a methodological approach in order to compare the cost-effectiveness of existing public health measures against human influenza pandemics in four target countries: France, Italy, Poland and Romania. This article presents the results relevant to the French health system using a data set specifically collected for this purpose.

Methods: Eighteen public health interventions against human influenza pandemics were selected. Additionally, two public-health criteria were considered: 'achieving mortality reduction ≥40%' and 'achieving morbidity reduction ≥30%'. Costs and effectiveness data sources include existing reports, publications and expert opinions. Cost distributions were taken into account using a uniform distribution, according to the French health system.

Results: Using reduction of mortality as an effectiveness criterion, the most cost-effective options was 'implementation of new equipment of Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) equipment'. Targeting vaccination to health professionals appeared more cost-effective than vaccination programs targeting at risk populations. Concerning antiviral distribution programs, curative programs appeared more cost-effective than preventive programs. Using reduction of morbidity as effectiveness criterion, the most cost-effective option was 'implementation of new equipment ECMO'. Vaccination programs targeting the general population appeared more cost-effective than both vaccination programs of health professionals or at-risk populations. Curative antiviral programs appeared more cost-effective than preventive distribution programs, whatever the pandemic scenario.

Conclusion: Intervention strategies against human influenza pandemics impose a substantial economic burden, suggesting a need to develop public-health cost-effectiveness assessments across countries.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't